“DIARY OF A WINNER”

JOHNNY EVERS & EDDIE PLANK

THE 1914 "MIRACLE" BRAVES
 WORLD SERIES, GAME #2
Bill James allows the A's only two hits
in the Braves ninth inning, 1-0 win

October 10, 1914 ... A doubleplay started by Rabbit Maranville closed a ninth-inning rally with the Boston Braves beating the Philadelphia Athletics in the second game of the World Series by a score of 1 to 0, giving Boston a two-game advantage over the champion Athletics. The game today was a very sensational contest and was in doubt until the last man was out at first on the game ending double play.

Bill James pitched a great game allowing only two hits, a double in the sixth and a single in the seventh. Wally Schang, who hit the double, trying to make it to third on a short passed ball and was thrown out by Hank Gowdy on a very close play. It was lucky that he was thrown out, because he would've scored from third on Eddie Collins' slow ground ball down to Johnny Evers that he beat out for an infield hit.

James had the Philadelphia team at his mercy and kept them off the bases in five of the nine innings, while the Braves were on base nearly all the time and nothing but the great pitching of Eddie Plank and the all around great Philly defense kept the Athletics in the game until the ninth-inning. Then they made two bad blunders that cost them the game. Charlie Deal, after hitting a double, on a misjudged fly ball by Amos Strunk, reached third on a passed ball by Wally Schang. He then was able to score the only run of the ballgame, on a base hit by Leslie Mann.

EDDIE PLANK

The Athletics were ready to go and full of pepper before the game and brought the crowd to its feet with some remarkable infield practice. They looked like they were full of fight and determined to regain lost ground, while the Braves just appeared confident and went about their business. The Boston Royal Rooters were busy bunch, while the local players were being encouraged much more liberally than they were yesterday, and seemed to realize that they must play very well in order to win.

The day was extremely warm and the players showed the effects of the heat. Although it seemed to affect James near the end of the game, Eddie Plank seemed to thrive on the heat and pitched better and better. The great infield play of the athletics was cheered by their fans and it seemed utterly impossible to break through time and time again. When the Braves are positioned score run with a hit, they seem to see the ball being hit right at one of the infielders or the outfielders.

Plank gave a great performance and bothered the Braves, keeping them off balance. As in the game yesterday, the Braves forced him to make good pitches by never going after bad ones, while the Athletics batters looked like rank amateurs, swinging and missing at balls out of the strike zone, when they could have easily worked a base on balls.

Manager Stallings has coached his pitchers well, in the way that Frank Baker and Stuffy McInnis failed, shows that they had been sized up very accurately by the staff. In fact it seems as if the Athletics have no idea about the Braves batters, while just the reverse is the case with the Boston team.

The first thrill of the game came in the first with two men on and two down, when Plank allowed Gowdy to send a long fly ball to center that Strunk had to chase down. In the same inning, Eddie Murphy tried for second when a throw to first from James almost got by Butch Schmidt, but he recovered in time to get the base runner at second base.

A brilliant play by Jack Barry saved a lot of trouble in the third, when Johnny Evers followed it with a single. Again in the fourth inning, the Braves had two men on and two out, when Barry made a great play to get the last out. In the sixth, with two men out, the Braves had two runs on when Barry made another great force play at second to save a run.

All this time, the Philadelphia hitters were walking to the plate and returning to the dugout without a hit in sight. Then in the sixth inning Schang turned in their first hit of the game. But a moment later he was thrown out trying for third on a short passed ball, with Charlie Deal making a great stop to tag the runner.

In the eighth-inning, Ted Cather hit one down to Barry who threw wildly to first. Stuffy McInnis caught the throw with his glove and spun around, diving at the bag and placing his bare hand on the base to get the out. Possum Whitted was the next man up and Barry fumbled the ball and then threw wide of the bag at first, for an error. There was ultimately no harm done because Gowdy hit a long fly ball to centerfield.

BILL JAMES

Then came the ninth-inning and with one down Deal hit a fly to centerfield that Amos Strunk misjudged and let drop for two bases. Deal then took a big lead off second and broke for third. When Schang threw the ball down to Barry, he juggled it for second and was not able to make the throw. James struck out but Leslie Mann came across with the winning single and the Macks were in the hole 1 to 0 and time running out.

Then came their last chance. Barry worked a base on balls and Schang tried to sacrifice, but ended up striking out. Jimmy Walsh was sent in to bat for Plank and drew a pass, that put runners on first and second. With everyone on the move and the count three and two, Eddie Murphy hit a fast grounder that the Rabbit picked up on the dead run, touched the base just ahead of Walsh and in one motion threw the runner out at first to end the game.

Manager Stallings said before the game that the Braves would win the Series and there is no doubt he feels the same way tonight. It is for sure that the Athletics will play a harder game in Boston and offer a stubborn resistance before surrendering the title of the greatest honor in baseball.

The fans all left the park satisfied that they had seen a remarkable game and lost it only by the slimmest of margins. Red Sox President Joseph Lannin, decked out in Rooters insignias, took his seat with the group and was as ardent as anyone. He led the cheering on several occasions. Throughout the game the Royal Rooters never forgot themselves and every fine play of the Philadelphia team, they cheered in true sportsmanlike fashion. In the seventh inning the Athletics fans began a concerted clapping of hands and stamping of feet in an effort to distract Bill James, but the Rooters never resorted to the same tactics.

THE ROYAL ROOTERS

But when the last doubleplay was completed in the last inning, the demonstration that followed will live in the memory of Bostonians and Philadelphians for a long time. When the bedlam ceased, the last act on the diamond was given by the Royal Rooters, who marched across the field behind the brass band, with ex-Mayor Fitzgerald. Johnny Evers, who was making his way off the field, was discovered by the Rooters and paraded with them until President Gaffney prevailed upon his Captain to take his place in front of the band with himself, the Mayor and President Lannin.

Meanwhile, up in the Bronx, pitcher Dick Rudolph who won yesterday's game, was there for the arrival of his second child.



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1914 WORLD SERIES

 

 

Boston Braves

2 Games

 

 

Philadelphia Athletics

0 Games

 

 

 

1914 WORLD SERIES GAME #2 ... at Shibe Park

R

H

E

BOSTON BRAVES

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

 

1

7

1

PHILADELPHIA ATHLETICS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

0

2

1

W-Bill James (1-0)
L-Eddie Plank (0-1)
Attendance – 20,562

2B-Deal (Bost), Schang (Phil)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BRAVES

 

AB

R

H

 

 

Les Mann rf 5 0 2  

 

Johnny Evers 2b 4 0 2  

 

Ted Cather lf 5 0 0  

 

Possum Whitted cf 3 0 0  

 

Butch Schmidt 1b 4 0 1  

 

Hank Gowdy c 2 0 0  

 

Rabbit Maranville ss 2 0 1  

 

Charlie Deal 3b 4 1 1  

 

Bill James p 4 0 0  
             
    IP H ER SO  
  Bill James 9 2 0 8  

 

 

 

 

 

             

 

ATHLETICS

 

AB

R

H

 

 

Eddie Murphy

rf

3 0 0  

 

Rube Oldring

lf

3 0 0  

 

Eddie Collins

2b

3 0 1  

 

Frank Baker

3b

3 0 0  

 

Stuffy McInnis

1b

3 0 0  

 

Amos Strunk

cf

3 0 0  

 

Jack Barry

ss

2 0 0  

 

Wally Schang

c

3 0 1  

 

Eddie Plank

p

2 0 0  

 

Jimmy Walsh

ph

0 0 0  
             
    IP H ER SO  
 

Eddie Plank

9 7 1 6