RABBIT MARANVILLE

THE 1915 BOSTON BRAVES
A great battle at Fenway is ended by the Rabbit

July 23, 1915 ... The Braves and the Cubs tightened up their belts and played one of the most stubbornly contested games seen in Boston this year. The battle lasted 11 innings and the Braves were again victorious by a 2 to 1 score. By winning, the Braves moved up into sixth place as the Giants dropped from a triple tie for fourth place, into seventh place.

President John K. Tener of the National League was at the game, having come to inquire into the trouble between Johnny Evers and umpire Ernie Quigley. The two shook hands before the game and nothing occurred during the game of any significance. The only mild protestation happened in the eighth inning when Heinie Zimmerman tried to steal second and was declared out by umpire Bob Emslie. He began to protest when it suddenly occurred to him who was seated in one of the front boxes. He turned toward President Tener and yelled over to him, "I hope you saw that. It was the same way yesterday." He said a few more things to Emslie before taking his position at second base.

There also were some protests at the plate, where umpire Quigley heard some grievances on a called strike to Herbie Moran and by Johnny Evers after he was called out on strikes. These little ripples disappeared shortly and the whole game went along rather smoothly.

The game itself was a thriller. Hippo Vaughn and Lefty Tyler made a pitcher's duel out of it. Both of the runs that were scored on each were tainted. The one scored on Tyler was due to a poor throw to the plate and Vaughn, himself, forced over the one scored against him, by giving three base on balls in succession. These two runs were all they could be made in ten innings, but it in the 11th the real run of the game was made and there was nothing false in its construction.

Lefty Tyler pitched a great game, allowing only five hits, and he pulled himself out of to deep holes with his clever work. He gave up his first hit in the fifth inning, and in the eighth-inning he started by passing Zimmerman. Cy Williams forced Zimmerman at second and was and then turn forced himself by Pete Knisely. Jimmy Archer, the next batter up, slashed a hit into left field for a double. Dick Egan bobbled the ball and got it back to Red Smith at third in time to get Knisely at the plate. Knisely would have been out by 15 feet, but Smith threw the ball into the dirt and it bounded away from Gowdy, allowing the runner to score. Tyler then uncorked a wild pitch putting Archer on third, and passed Bresnahan purposely. He did not want to pass Vaughn but did so, and therefore put himself badly in a hole. Wilbur Good came to the plate and Tyler then coaxed him into hit one into centerfield that Magee pulled in, and the storm clouds passed, but the Cubs had tied the score at 1 to 1.

The game went into extra innings and in the 10th Bresnahan was hit on the foot by a foul tip, which was later learned to have caused a broken toe. He then slammed the ball against the left-field scoreboard and hobbled to first, where Polly McLarry came in to run for him. Humphries attempted to sacrifice and Smith came in quickly, grabbed the ball, and threw it into right field. That put McLarry on third and Humphries on second with nobody out. Tyler then pulled himself out of a hole, with the help of the good fielding behind him. Good hit a high pop fly that Maranville gathered in for the first out. Bob Fisher hit a bounder back to the mound and Tyler threw McLarry out at the plate for the second out. Red Murray came up next and hit a hot grounder down to the Rabbit, who made a nice pickup and landed on second base for the force out and the inning was over.

Manager Bresnahan had taken Vaughn out of the game because of his lack of control and brought in Bert Humphries in the eighth inning. He went along smoothly until the 11th, when Sherry Magee, the first man to face him, plunked a single into left field. Butch Schmidt followed with another to center and Smith set the stage by moving both runners over with a sacrifice. The Cubs closed in on the diamond for a play at the plate and Maranville, who had distinguished himself on several occasions during the afternoon, put on the finishing touch of a great day's work, by shooting the ball into centerfield. Moran scored and Schmidt could have also if the run was needed but it wasn't and the game was over for the second day with a walk-off.

 

FENWAY PARK

 

P

C

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

 

R

H

E

 
     

CHICAGO CUBS

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

 

1

5

0

 
     

BOSTON BRAVES

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

 

2

7

3

 

 

W-Lefty Tyler (6-6)
L-Bert Humphries (4-6)
Attendance - 5500

2B-Archer (Chi), Moran (Bost), Tyler (Bost)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AB

R

H

AVG

 

 

Herbie Moran rf 4 1 2 .218  

 

Johnny Evers 2b 4 0 1 .220  

 

Dick Egan lf 3 0 0 .211  

 

Joe Connolly ph/lf 1 0 0 .281  

 

Sherry Magee cf 4 1 1 .277  

 

Butch Schmidt 1b 4 0 1 .265  

 

Red Smith 3b 2 0 0 .305  

 

Rabbit Maranville ss 5 0 1 .252  

 

Bert Whaling c 4 0 0 .227  

 

Lefty Tyler p 3 0 1 .291  
               
    IP H ER BB SO  
  Lefty Tyler 11 5 0 5 1  

 

 

         

 

 

 

1915 NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDINGS

 

 

Philadelphia Phillies 45 36 -

 

 

Brooklyn Robins 45 39 1 1/2

 

 

Chicago Cubs 43 41 3 1/2

 

 

Pittsburgh Pirates 42 41 4

 

 

St. Louis Cardinals 43 45 5 1/2

 

 

BOSTON BRAVES

41 44 6

 

 

New York Giants 38 41 6

 

 

Cincinnati Reds 35 45 9 1/2