1920 BOSTON RED SOX ...
"CURSED" - BABE RUTH IS SOLD ...

 

Ray Chapman
Died: Aug 18th
Vern Bickford   Vern Stephens   Jake Jones   George Metkovich
Born: Aug 17th   Born: Oct 23rd   Born: Nov 23rd   Born: Oct 8th
Early Wynn   Sibby Sisti   Bob Lemon   Stan Musial
Born: Jan 6th   Born: June 26th   Born: Sept 22nd   Born: Nov 21st

 

After the 1919 baseball season, Babe Ruth capitalized on his popularity by barnstorming around the country, hitting home runs and landing in Los Angeles where he tested the waters of the film industry. He earned $10,000 on this trip, which combined, with his baseball salary, bonus and other income, pushed his annual take toward $30,000 for the year. That was not enough for Ruth, because he still felt underpaid and wanted $20,000 for his contract in 1920 from the Red Sox. At the time Ty Cobb and Eddie Collins, who each earned $15,000 annually topped the scale. President Harry Frazee said that Ruth was under contract and if he didn't want to play in 1920, that was fine with him.

HARRY FRAZEE

Frazee had never shown any patience in the theater business for those who failed to live up to their contracts or tried to squeeze him. The show must go on and the players were interchangeable and secondary to the larger production. He had fired performers and writers who had failed to live up to their contracts and would continue to do so. To Frazee, ballplayers were no different and in the post Federal League era, baseball contracts were dropping, so Frazee felt that if he caved into Ruth, every player on the team would want more money.

On December 26, 1919 Frazee agreed to sell Babe Ruth to New York for a total of $100,000. $25,000 would be paid in cash and three $25,000 payments were to be paid at one year intervals with 6% interest. The deal was contingent upon the Yankees getting Ruth under contract. Frazee and Yankee owner Jake Ruppert also reached another agreement. Ruppert agreed to help Frazee by loaning him $300,000 with Fenway Park as the security. He accepted the Yankee offer of cash and notes, only after manager Ed Barrow informed in there were no players on the Yankee roster that he wanted. The deal worked for Frazee on several fronts. It rid him of a problem, strengthened his coalition with New York in the war against Ban Johnson, and gave him the cash he knew he'd need, to rebuild his club.

New York manager Miller Huggins traveled to California and got Ruth to agree to a contract and accept a $20,000 bonus, and the deal was announced on January 5, 1920. The news hit Boston hard, but none were hit harder than the Boston sportswriters, who cherished Ruth as good copy. The deal was front-page news. Frazee was prepared to be criticized and released a 1500 word statement that outlined his thinking. Local baseball figures like Hugh Duffy, Bill Carrigan and Fred Tenney all agreed with Frazee.

BABE RUTH

The deal also had other implications that made sense to Frazee. It provided him with operating capital and a reserve if Ban Johnson tried to mount a challenge to his right to operate the franchise.

The trade was not one-sided because the Yankees ran the risk of taking on Ruth and therefore they did not pay the full amount to the Red Sox in cash. They were concerned about their relationship with the New York Giants from whom they rented the Polo Grounds as their home ballpark. Ruppert paid Frazee in installments so he could build start to himself a brand-new ball park.

The Yankees needed a draw to lure fans away from the Giants, and in the Polo Grounds with a short right field fence, Ruppert felt that Ruth would hit better than anywhere else. But he also felt that apart from his behavioral problems, Ruth's lifestyle did not suggest that he would have a long career. At a time where players were washed up to 30 years old, the 25-year-old Ruth was growing heavier and more out of shape each year. Most observers thought that his pitching career was over and his continued improvement at the plate was no certainty. He still had trouble hitting left-handed pitchers and was prone to prolonged batting slumps. Had the Babe stayed in Boston, he may still have become the greatest home run hitter of his era, but he never would have approached the marks he set with the Yankees. Of additional significance was the fact that the lighter and livelier baseball, which later inflated his power numbers, and not yet been introduced. There was simply no way to predict what Ruth would later become. The Yankees were taking on a huge and expensive gamble. Ruth was not a sure bet.

The loan was another matter entirely. The agreement was not between the two baseball teams, but was between Ruppert and Frazee themselves. The loan that secured using Fenway Park as collateral was risk-free because the land on which Fenway Park sat was worth more than the amount of loan. Frazee wanted the loan because he was eyeing the purchase of a New York theater and Ruppert was offering him more flexible terms then was a bank. It Frazee defaulted on his loan, he could always rent Fenway Park back from Ruppert. A bank would sell it off, and the most likely buyers would have been Ban Johnson and his supporters.

A long incorrect accepted interpretation of the sale of Ruth and the others to New York contended that Frazee was in financial trouble and used the proceeds to finance his stage interests, which eventually paid off in the success of the play, "No No Nanette". The one fact that was proven to be correct, was that Boston was left with a second rate franchise. Frazee became the villain and yet the truth is a more complicated story.

Frazee had no financial trouble whatsoever. All evidence indicated otherwise. Stories that he was one step away from the poor house were created years later by Boston writers who hated him from the very beginning because he was a New Yorker. Frazee never bothered to correct the perception because he didn't care. It was still sound business to have baseball owners have their wealth underestimated. It served Frazee well, for some in Boston to believe that he was broke, because it held down salaries.

The truth is that Frazee had many balls in the air. He had a theater chain, three Schubert theatres that he leased, his own two theaters, a real estate management firm, a real estate investment company, and a stock brokerage company. If anything, in 1920 his stock was rising. His new play, "My Lady Friends" opened to rave reviews, eventually running for 228 performances. At the time of Babe Ruth's sale to New York, the show was earning Frazee $3000 each week. He put the play on the road and his engagement in Boston was similarly successful.

JOE LANNIN &
BAN JOHNSON

The other financial problem he had, was with the previous owner of the Red Sox, Joe Lannin. Lannin had floated Frazee a loan to purchase the Red Sox.  In May 1919, the two had a dispute and Frazee stopped making interest payments. Then on November 1, 1919 he purposely missed a payment on the note for $125,000. Lannin demanded his payment and Frazee ignored him. The reason for these non-payments, was that Frazee thought that a $30,000 share of the American League's settlement with the Federal League was the responsibility of Lannin to pay and not his.

Three days after the sale of Ruth, Frazee began rebuilding his club, trading Braggo Roth and Red Shannon to Washington for a veteran infielder Kid Foster, outfielder Mike Menosky, and left-handed pitcher Harry Harper. Harper was the key to the deal. He was only 24 years old and considered one of the best young pitchers in the American League.

On February 1, 1920 the Yankees filed suit against Ban Johnson for $500,000 over the deal made with the Red Sox for Carl Mays in 1919. Johnson had withheld the money that the Yankees had earned for finishing in third place in 1919, and failed to recognize games in which Mays had pitched for New York. When the league winter meetings started in Chicago, the war heated up again. Johnson's supporters backed off and he reinstated Mays and gave the Yankees their money, because he did not want to be involved in a costly litigation. In return, the Yankees dropped their lawsuits. Johnson still was not surrendering, but was out to get revenge against Ruppert and his supporters, Harry Frazee and Charles Comiskey.

WAITE HOYT

At the winter meeting, Johnson met with Lannin, who now owned the International League's Buffalo team. The two men discovered that they had a common enemy in Harry Frazee. On February 9th, as Frazee was undermining Johnson at the meetings in Chicago, Lannin was doing the same to Frazee in Boston. He slapped a lien on Fenway Park for Frazee's non-payment of the loan. Unless Lannin was paid off by March 3rd, he'd sell Fenway Park at auction. Frazee was caught off guard and returned to Boston amid rumors that he was selling the team. Lannin next got an injunction that barred Frazee from getting any more players, pending payment of his loan. As spring training was about to begin, the Red Sox no longer had Babe Ruth and had nobody to replace him.

Ban Johnson thought he had Frazee cornered and now returned to the fight. He came to Boston intent on putting together a group to buy the Red Sox on the cheap, and get rid of Frazee for good. But Frazee spurned offers for the team, made some legal maneuvers against Lannin, to get more time, and started making plans for the 1920 baseball season.

The Red Sox begin spring training in total disarray. As Frazee had feared, catcher Wally Schang and thirdbaseman Oscar Vitt had followed Babe Ruth lead, and were holdouts. In spite of all this the Red Sox played good baseball in spring training. Joe Bush's arm felt better and holdovers from the 1919 team, Herb Pennock, Sam Jones and Waite Hoyt, supplemented by Allen Russell, and now Harry Harper, gave the Red Sox the deepest pitching staff in the league. While the offense was not particularly potent, the team knew how to manufacture runs and their defense was still superb.

The Red Sox opened the season with two wins and on Patriots' Day, April 19th, the Yankees came back into Boston for a doubleheader with Babe Ruth. Before 10,000 fans in the opener, Waite Hoyt shutout New York 4 to 0. The Babe received a huge ovation, but did little damage against the young pitcher. In game two, the fans got on Yankees starter, Carl Mays, who was booed unmercifully by the crowd. Joe Bush downed the Yankees in the game by a score of 8 to 3 and Boston took the final game of the series the next day. After 12 games, the Red Sox were a surprising 10-2, and it was the Yankees who were in the second division.

While his team's quick start relieved Frazee of one worry, he still had to fend off Lannin. Because of the lien against Fenway Park, Frazee asked Ruppert for an extension on his loan, to May 15th. He needed to settle with a Lannin, and also was working a deal to buy the Harris Theater in New York. Ruppert agreed to the extension. Lannin knew that a court case would hurt both parties and agreed to a settlement.

HARRY HARPER

Frazee now signed Vitt and Schang to new contracts, reportedly near what they were asking for. With the legal matters cleared, the $300,000 loan from Ruppert went through on May 25th. Six weeks after that, Frazee bought the Harris Theater. It was a savvy move, because in the 1920s Broadway was booming and theaters were in short supply. Frazee's purchase began earning him money immediately.

In the meantime, the Red Sox continued to play better than expected. They ended the month of May with a record of 22-14, in 2nd place only 3 1/2 games out of first and ahead of the 23-15 Yankees. Tim Hendryx, a journey men ball player, who replaced the Babe in the Red Sox lineup, was leading the league with a .397 batting average. Attendance at Fenway Park was holding steady, and in their first eight meetings, the Red Sox had beaten the Yankees five times. Frazee began to look like a genius.

A streak of injuries and bad luck, then exposed the club's lack of depth. Hendryx went down with a bad leg and so catcher, Wally Schang moved to the outfield. The second string catcher, Roxy Walters had to move behind the plate, and he was a weak hitter. Then pitcher Waite Hoyt, went down with a pulled groin, had surgery, and missed 13 weeks. Pitcher Allen Russell collapsed from a cerebral hemorrhage and Harry Hooper was hospitalized after a foul ball hit him on the foot and caused an abscess. The team's defense suffered, and the Red Sox lost all the close games, they had been winning during the first two months of the season. In June and July they were 18-38.

ELMER MYERS

Manager Ed Barrow and Harry Frazee tried to fill the holes but weren't able to make any trades. They were not dealing from strength, and still had an enemy in Ban Johnson. Although Johnson had been stripped of much of his power, he was still the president of the American League and did wield considerable influence over the teams that were loyal to him. Ruppert, Comiskey and Frazee were on able to make significant trades with each other and all the other owners knew that they would feel the wrath of Johnson, if they dealt with these three teams.

But in June, the Sox did pick up pitcher Elmer Myers on waivers from Cleveland. He turned out to be the league's best pitcher for the rest of the season, winning nine of the ten games he started, but it wasn't enough.

When Boston's injured players returned to the lineup in August, the club started winning again and finished fifth in the American League with a record of 72-81, only a few percentage points worse than the year before. The Yankees finished third, three games behind the American League Champion, Cleveland Indians. Harry Frazee had become briefly vindicated. The Red Sox had finished in virtually the same position as their 1919 club, and even scored more runs per game. The attendance at Fenway Park held steady, and Frazee prospered in baseball and in his other ventures.

Babe Ruth had an incredible year. He had 54 home runs, batted .376, driving in 137 and scoring 158 runs. But the season ended on a dark note, as the Chicago Black Sox scandal came to light.

 

GAME LOG
  RECORD PLACE GB/GF  OPPONENT   SCORE  PITCHER W/L
04/15/1920 1-0 1st -  Washington Nationals W 7-6 Allen Russell 1-0
04/16/1920 1-0 1st -  Washington Nationals pp  
04/17/1920 2-0 1st -  Washington Nationals W 2-1 Joe Bush 1-0
04/18/1920 2-0 1st -  
04/19/1920 3-0 1st -  New York Yankees W 6-0 Waite Hoyt 1-0
4-0 1st - W 8-3 Joe Bush 2-0
04/20/1920 5-0 1st -  New York Yankees W 3-2 Herb Pennock 1-0
04/21/1920 5-0 1st -  New York Yankees pp  
04/22/1920 5-1 1st -  at Washington Nationals L 8-5 Benn Karr 0-1
04/23/1920 6-1 1st -

 at Washington Nationals

W 4-2 Sam Jones 1-0
04/24/1920 7-1 1st -

 at Washington Nationals

W 7-3 Waite Hoyt 2-0
04/25/1920 7-2 2nd -1/2  at Washington Nationals L 2-0 Joe Bush 0-1
04/26/1920 8-2 1st -

 at Philadelphia Athletics

W 9-0 Herb Pennock 2-0
04/27/1920 8-2 1st -  at Philadelphia Athletics pp  
04/28/1920 8-2 1st -  at Philadelphia Athletics T 7-7  
04/29/1920 9-2 1st -

 at Philadelphia Athletics

W 7-1 Joe Bush 3-1
04/30/1920 10-2 1st -

 at New York Yankees

W 4-2 Waite Hoyt 3-0
05/01/1920 10-3 1st -

 at New York Yankees

L 6-0 Herb Pennock 2-1
05/02/1920 10-4 3rd -1/2

 at New York Yankees

L 7-1 Sam Jones 1-1
05/03/1920 11-4 2nd -1/2

 at New York Yankees

W 3-1 Allen Russell 2-0
05/04/1920 11-5 2nd -1/2

 at New York Yankees

L 6-1 Waite Hoyt 3-1
05/05/1920 12-5 1st -  Philadelphia Athletics W 4-3 Herb Pennock 3-1
05/06/1920 13-5 1st -  Philadelphia Athletics W 3-1 Sam Jones 2-1
05/07/1920 13-6 1st -  Philadelphia Athletics L 5-4 Allen Russell 2-1
05/08/1920 13-6 1st -  Philadelphia Athletics pp  
05/09/1920 13-6 2nd -1/2  
05/10/1920 14-6 2nd -1/2  Philadelphia Athletics W 7-1 Harry Harper 1-0
05/11/1920 14-6 2nd -1/2  Cleveland Indians pp  
05/12/1920 14-7 2nd -1 1/2  Cleveland Indians L 9-7 Joe Bush 3-2
05/13/1920 14-7 2nd -1 1/2  Cleveland Indians pp  
05/14/1920 14-7 2nd -1 1/2  Cleveland Indians pp  
05/15/1920 14-8 2nd -1 1/2  Chicago White Sox L 2-1 Herb Pennock 3-2
05/16/1920 14-8 2nd -2  
05/17/1920 15-8 2nd -1 1/2  Chicago White Sox W 2-1 Sam Jones 3-1
05/18/1920 15-9 2nd -1 1/2  Chicago White Sox L 4-3 Joe Bush 3-3
05/19/1920 16-9 2nd -1 1/2  Chicago White Sox W 3-2 Harry Harper 2-0
05/20/1920 17-9 2nd -1 1/2  Detroit Tigers W 6-0 Herb Pennock 4-2
05/21/1920 18-9 2nd -1 1/2  Detroit Tigers W 8-3 Allen Russell 3-1
05/22/1920 18-9 2nd -2  Detroit Tigers pp  
05/23/1920 18-9 2nd -1 1/2  
05/24/1920 19-9 2nd -1  St. Louis Browns W 5-1 Joe Bush 4-3
05/25/1920 20-9 2nd -1/2  St. Louis Browns W 3-2 Sam Jones 4-1
05/26/1920 21-9 1st -  St. Louis Browns W 9-5 Herb Pennock 5-2
05/27/1920 21-10 1st -  New York Yankees L 6-1 Harry Harper 2-1
05/28/1920 21-11 2nd -1  New York Yankees L 4-3 Allen Russell 3-2
05/29/1920 21-12 2nd -1  New York Yankees L 4-3 Joe Bush 4-4
21-13 2nd -2 L 8-3 Sam Jones 4-2
05/30/1920 21-13 2nd -2 1/2  
06/27/1920 29-29 5th -9 1/2  New York Yankees L 7-5 Allen Russell 5-6
05/31/1920 22-13 2nd -2 1/2  Philadelpha Athletics W 3-1 Herb Pennock 6-2
22-14 2nd -3 1/2 L 9-4 Harry Harper 4-2
06/01/1920 22-15 3rd -3 1/2  Philadelpha Athletics L 8-6 Sam Jones 4-3
22-16 3rd -4 L 7-2 Joe Bush 4-5
06/02/1920 22-16 3rd -4 1/2  
06/03/1920 22-17 3rd -4 1/2  at Washington Nationals L 2-1 Allen Russell 3-3
06/04/1920 22-17 3rd -4  at Washington Nationals pp  
06/05/1920 22-17 3rd -3 1/2  at Washington Nationals pp  
06/06/1920 22-18 4th -4  at Washington Nationals L 5-4 Herb Pennock 6-3
06/07/1920 22-18 4th -4  
06/08/1920 23-18 3rd -4

 at Chicago White Sox

W 4-1 Sam Jones 5-3
06/09/1920 24-18 3rd -4

 at Chicago White Sox

W 3-2 Joe Bush 5-5
06/10/1920 25-18 3rd -4

 at Chicago White Sox

W 8-1 Allen Russell 4-3
06/11/1920 25-19 4th -5

 at Chicago White Sox

L 5-4 Herb Pennock 6-4
06/12/1920 25-20 3rd -6

 at St. Louis Browns

L 15-4 Sam Jones 5-4
06/13/1920 25-21 4th -6

 at St. Louis Browns

L 11-5 Sam Jones 5-5
06/14/1920 25-22 4th -7

 at St. Louis Browns

L 10-5 Allen Russell 4-4
06/15/1920 25-23 4th -8

 at St. Louis Browns

L 12-8 Herb Pennock 6-5
06/16/1920 25-23 4th -8  at Detroit Tigers pp  
06/17/1920 26-23 4th -7 1/2  at Detroit Tigers W 2-1 Joe Bush 6-5
06/18/1920 26-24 4th -8 1/2  at Detroit Tigers L 1-0 Sam Jones 5-6
06/19/1920 27-24 4th -7 1/2  at Detroit Tigers W 4-3 Allen Russell 5-4
06/20/1920 28-24 4th -6 1/2  at Cleveland Indians W 10-9 Benn Karr 1-1
06/21/1920 28-25 4th -7 1/2  at Cleveland Indians L 3-2 Harry Harper 2-3
06/22/1920 28-26 4th -8 1/2  at Cleveland Indians L 13-5 Joe Bush 6-6
06/23/1920 28-27 5th -9 1/2  at Cleveland Indians L 7-6 Allen Russell 5-5
06/24/1920 28-27 5th -9 1/2  
06/25/1920 29-27 5th -8 1/2  at New York Yankees W 6-3 Herb Pennock 7-5
06/26/1920 29-28 5th -8 1/2  at New York Yankees L 14-0 Joe Bush 6-7
06/27/1920 29-29 5th -9 1/2  at New York Yankees L 7-5 Allen Russell 5-6
06/28/1920 29-29 5th -10  
06/29/1920 29-30 5th -11 1/2  at New York Yankees L 6-5 Sam Jones 5-7
06/30/1920 30-30 5th -10 1/2  Washington Nationals W 4-3 Joe Bush 7-7
30-31 5th -11 L 5-2 Herb Pennock 7-6
07/01/1920 30-32 5th -12  Washington Nationals L 1-0 Harry Harper 2-4
07/02/1920 31-32 5th -12  Washington Nationals W 10-9 Benn Karr 2-1
07/03/1920 31-32 5th -13  Washington Nationals pp  
07/04/1920 31-32 5th -12 1/2  at Doherty Silk Sox W 7-6  
07/05/1920 32-32 5th -11 1/2

 at Philadelphia Athletics

W 6-1 Herb Pennock 8-6
33-32 5th -10 1/2 W 10-3 Joe Bush 8-7
07/06/1920 34-32 5th -10 1/2  at Philadelphia Athletics W 11-0 Sam Jones 6-7
34-33 5th -11 L 5-1 Harry Harper 2-5
07/07/1920 34-34 5th -11 1/2  at Philadelphia Athletics L 6-0 Benn Karr 2-2
34-35 5th -12 L 1-0 Gary Fortune 0-1
07/08/1920 34-36 5th -12 1/2  St. Louis Browns L 4-0 Herb Pennock 8-7
07/09/1920 35-36 5th -12 1/2  St. Louis Browns W 2-1 Joe Bush 9-7
07/10/1920 35-37 5th -13  St. Louis Browns L 9-2 Sam Jones 6-8
07/11/1920 35-37 5th -13 1/2  
07/12/1920 35-38 6th -14  St. Louis Browns L 3-2 Harry Harper 2-6
07/13/1920 35-39 6th -15  Detroit Tigers L 10-4 Herb Pennock 8-8
07/14/1920 36-39 6th -15  Detroit Tigers W 6-5 Herb Pennock 9-8
37-39 6th -14 1/2 W 4-0 Herb Pennock 10-8
07/15/1920 37-39 6th -15  Detroit Tigers pp  
07/16/1920 37-40 6th -15  Detroit Tigers L 6-5 Sam Jones 6-9
07/17/1920 37-41 6th -16  Cleveland Indians L 5-2 Sam Jones 6-10
37-42 6th -17 L 5-2 Harry Harper 2-7
07/18/1920 37-42 5th -17  
07/19/1920 37-43 6th -18  Cleveland Indians L 10-6 Joe Bush 9-8
38-43 6th -17 W 5-4 Herb Pennock 11-8
07/20/1920 38-44 6th -18  Cleveland Indians L 9-8 Benn Karr 2-3
07/21/1920 39-44 6th -17  Chicago White Sox W 2-1 Sam Jones 7-10
07/22/1920 39-45 6th -17  Chicago White Sox L 2-1 Harry Harper 2-8
07/23/1920 39-46 6th -18  Chicago White Sox L 8-7 Gary Fortune 0-2
07/24/1920 39-47 6th -18  Chicago White Sox L 7-4 Joe Bush 9-9
07/25/1920 39-48 6th -19  at New York Yankees L 8-2 Waite Hoyt 3-2
07/26/1920 40-48 6th -18 1/2  at New York Yankees W 9-0 Sam Jones 8-10
07/27/1920 40-48 6th -18 1/2  at Parkesburg Iron Co W 2-0  
07/28/1920 40-49 6th -19 1/2  at Cleveland Indians L 8-0 Harry Harper 2-9
07/29/1920 40-50 6th -20 1/2  at Cleveland Indians L 9-3 Herb Pennock 11-9
07/30/1920 40-51 6th -21 1/2  at Cleveland Indians L 13-4 Joe Bush 9-10
07/31/1920 40-52 6th -22 1/2  at Cleveland Indians L 2-1 Sam Jones 8-11
08/01/1920 41-52 6th -21 1/2  at Detroit Tigers W 4-2 Waite Hoyt 4-2
08/02/1920 41-53 6th -22 1/2  at Detroit Tigers L 5-2 Joe Bush 9-11
41-54 6th -23 L 5-2 Joe Bush 9-12
08/03/1920 42-54 6th -23  at Detroit Tigers W 3-1 Herb Pennock 12-9
08/04/1920 43-54 6th -22  at Detroit Tigers W 5-1 Joe Bush 10-11
08/05/1920 44-54 6th -21 1/2  at Chicago White Sox W 4-2 Sam Jones 9-11
08/06/1920 44-55 6th -21 1/2

 at Chicago White Sox

L 4-3 Elmer Myers 2-5
08/07/1920 45-55 6th -21 1/2  at Chicago White Sox W 4-2 Harry Harper 3-10
08/08/1920 45-56 6th -22 1/2

 at Chicago White Sox

L 2-0 Herb Pennock 12-10
08/09/1920 46-56 6th -21 1/2  at St. Louis Browns W 5-4 Elmer Myers 3-5
08/10/1920 46-57 6th -22

 at St. Louis Browns

L 6-4 Joe Bush 10-12
08/11/1920 47-57 5th -21  at St. Louis Browns W 5-3 Harry Harper 4-10
08/12/1920 47-57 5th -20 1/2  
08/13/1920 47-58 5th -20 1/2

 at Philadelphia Athletics

L 3-1 Sam Jones 10-19
48-58 5th -20 W 7-0 Elmer Myers 4-5
08/14/1920 49-58 5th -19 1/2

 at Philadelphia Athletics

W 6-3 Joe Bush 11-12
08/15/1920 49-58 5th -19 1/2  at Torrington, CT L 7-4  
08/16/1920 50-58 5th -19 1/2  Detroit Tigers W 6-4 Herb Pennock 13-10
08/17/1920 51-58 5th -19  Detroit Tigers W 4-3 Sam Jones 10-12
51-59 5th -19 1/2 L 3-1 Harry Harper 4-11
08/18/1920 52-59 5th -18 1/2  Detroit Tigers W 6-5 Elmer Myers 5-5
08/19/1920 52-60 5th -19 1/2  Detroit Tigers L 4-0 Joe Bush 11-13
08/20/1920 52-60 5th -19 1/2  Ray Chapman's funeral
08/21/1920 53-60 5th -19 1/2  Cleveland Indians W 12-0 Waite Hoyt 5-2
54-60 5th -19 W 4-0 Herb Pennock 14-10
08/22/1920 54-60 5th -19 1/2  
08/23/1920 54-61 5th -20 1/2  Cleveland Indians L 2-1 Sam Jones 10-13
55-60 5th -19 1/2 W 4-3 Benn Karr 3-3
08/24/1920 56-60 5th -18 1/2  Cleveland Indians W 7-2 Joe Bush 12-13
08/25/1920 57-61 5th -18  St. Louis Browns W 11-1 Elmer Myers 6-5
08/26/1920 57-62 5th -19  St. Louis Browns L 8-0 Waite Hoyt 5-3
08/27/1920 57-63 5th -19  St. Louis Browns L 6-5 Benn Karr 3-4
08/28/1920 57-64 5th -19  St. Louis Browns L 7-0 Harry Harper 4-12
08/29/1920 57-64 5th -19  at Schneck Club W 4-2  
08/30/1920 58-64 5th -18  Chicago White Sox W 4-0 Sam Jones 4-0
08/31/1920 59-64 5th -17  Chicago White Sox W 7-3 Joe Bush 13-13
09/01/1920 60-64 5th -16 1/2  Chicago White Sox W 6-2 Herb Pennock 15-10
09/02/1920 61-64 5th -16  New York Yankees W 6-2 Elmer Myers 7-5
09/03/1920 61-65 5th -16  New York Yankees L 5-3 Benn Karr 3-5
09/04/1920 61-66 5th -17  New York Yankees L 5-3 Sam Jones 11-14
62-66 5th -16 1/2 W 6-5 Joe Bush 14-13
09/05/1920 62-67 5th -17 1/2  at Washington Nationals L 5-3 Herb Pennock 15-11
09/06/1920 62-68 5th -18 1/2  at Washington Nationals L 6-0 Sam Jones 11-15
62-69 5th -19 1/2 L 6-4 Waite Hoyt 5-4
09/07/1920 62-70 5th -20  at Washington Nationals L 5-1 Harry Harper 4-13
63-70 5th -19 1/2 W 5-3 Elmer Myers 8-5
09/08/1920 63-70 5th -19 1/2  
09/09/1920 63-71 5th -20 1/2  at Chicago White Sox L 6-5 Joe Bush 14-14
09/10/1920 63-72 5th -20 1/2  at Chicago White Sox L 5-3 Waite Hoyt 5-5
09/11/1920 64-72 5th -20  at Chicago White Sox W 9-7 Sam Jones 12-15
09/12/1920 65-72 5th -20  at St. Louis Browns W 9-7 Waite Hoyt 6-5
09/13/1920 66-72 5th -20  at St. Louis Browns W 5-4 Elmer Myers 9-5
09/14/1920 66-73 5th -21

 at St. Louis Browns

L 7-4 Harry Harper 4-14
09/15/1920 66-74 5th -21 1/2

 at St. Louis Browns

L 18-5 Benn Karr 3-6
09/16/1920 66-75 5th -21 1/2

 at Detroit Tigers

L 7-6 Herb Pennock 15-12
09/17/1920 66-76 5th -22 1/2

 at Detroit Tigers

L 14-13 Benn Karr 3-7
09/18/1920 67-76 5th -22 1/2  at Detroit Tigers W 7-4 Elmer Myers 10-5
09/19/1920 67-77 5th -23 1/2

 at Cleveland Indians

L 2-0 Herb Pennock 15-13
09/20/1920 67-78 5th -24 1/2

 at Cleveland Indians

L 8-3 Joe Bush 14-15
09/21/1920 67-79 5th -25 1/2

 at Cleveland Indians

L 12-1 Sam Jones 12-16
09/22/1920 67-79 5th -25 1/2  
09/23/1920 68-79 5th -24 1/2  Philadelphia Athletics W 9-2 Elmer Myers 11-5
09/24/1920 68-80 5th -25 1/2  Philadelphia Athletics L 10-9 Benn Karr 3-8
09/25/1920 69-80 5th -24 1/2  Philadelphia Athletics W 4-2 Joe Bush 15-15
09/26/1920 69-80 5th -25  
09/27/1920 70-80 5th -25  Washington Nationals W 2-1 Sam Jones 13-16
71-80 5th -24 1/2 W 2-0 Harry Harper 5-14
09/28/1920 72-80 5th -24 1/2  Washington Nationals W 5-3 Herb Pennock 16-13
72-81 5th -25 L 7-6 Waite Hoyt 6-6
 
1920 RED SOX BATTING & PITCHING
 
 

 

 

FINAL 1920 STANDINGS

 

 

Cleveland Indians 98 56 -

 

 

Chicago White Sox 96 58 2

 

 

New York Yankees 95 59 3

 

 

St. Louis Browns 76 77 21 1/2

 

 

BOSTON RED SOX 72 81 25 1/2

 

 

Washington Nationals 68 84 29

 

 

Detroit Tigers 61 93 37

 

 

Philadelphia Athletics 48 106 50

 

 

 

 

THIS CENTURY: AMERICA'S TIME - 1920-1929


 

 
1919 RED SOX 1921 RED SOX