THE BEST SEASON IN BOSTON'S BASEBALL HISTORY

JOE DOBSON

BOSTON RED SOX ...
THE CURSE OF THE BAMBINO, PART 3
A
SUBWAY SERIES DISAPPEARS ...
The Red Sox pound the Browns behind Joe Dobson

September 17, 1948 ... Before a handful of fans at Sportsman's Park, Joe Dobson pitched the Red Sox back into the win column and kept them one game in front of the American League race, winning 9 to 3. It was his fifth decision over the St. Louis Browns this season. He had the benefit of three, three run innings, although the Sox made only seven hits against four St. Louis pitchers.

The Sox were able to hit in the clutch, as seven of the run scorers had received free passes from the St. Louis pitchers. All afternoon the Sox defense was airtight and they were able to pull off five doubleplays. Bobby Doerr took part in four of the five twin killings and in all had ten chances. He ran his string of consecutive errorless chances to 396.

In the fourth inning, Sam Mele twisted his ankle and right knee, trying to steal third base. He was taken to the dressing room on a stretcher and later sent to hospital for x-rays. He was pronounced to have a bad strain and was back in the hotel lobby tonight. Before the injury, he had driven in three runs with a double and had led off with a single in the inning in which he was hurt.

The Sox gave Dobson a three run lead right off the bat. St. Louis starter, Bill Kennedy had given both Johnny Pesky and Ted Williams free passes and filled the bases by hitting Vern Stephens. Mele drove in all three runners with a double.

In the second inning, St. Louis got a run back on Les Moss' 13th homer into the left-field stands. Two walks by Dobson, in the fourth inning, gave the Browns two more runs to tie the game.

But the game was only tied momentarily as the Sox collected three more runs off Kennedy in the fifth. A free ticket to Pesky and a double by Williams, a wild pitch and Wally Moses' line drive to left, made it 6 to 3. In the ninth, Browns pitcher Karl Drews made two wild pitches and passed three batters to fill the bases, allowing Doerr to single in two more runs. Billy Goodman brought in the last run off Al Widmar.

In Detroit, the Yankees jammed across six runs, before a man was out, in the first inning, to shellack the Tigers, 13 to 5, leaving them one game behind the Sox. Jim Hegan batted in three runs with his 13th homer and Bob Feller struck out 11, to handle the Washington Senators their 17th straight defeat, 4 to 1, in Cleveland. The Indians stayed a game and a half behind the Yankees, in third place.

 

at Sportsman's Park (St. Louis) ...

R

H

E

BOSTON RED SOX

3

0

0

0

3

0

0

0

3

 

9

7

0

ST. LOUIS BROWNS

0

1

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

 

3

9

2

W-Joe Dobson (16-8)
L-Bill Kennedy (7-7)
Attendance 1922

2B-Mele (Bost), Williams (Bost)
HR-Moss (StL)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AB

R

H

AVG

 

 

Dom DiMaggio cf 5 0 0 .276  

 

Johnny Pesky 3b 1 3 0 .284  

 

Ted Williams lf 3 3 1 .379  

 

Vern Stephens ss 1 0 0 .274  

 

Bobby Doerr 2b 5 0 1 .289  

 

Sam Mele rf 2 0 2 .233  

 

Wally Moses rf 2 0 1 .259  

 

Billy Goodman 1b 5 0 2 .315  

 

Birdie Tebbetts c 4 0 0 .278  

 

Joe Dobson p 4 0 0 .200  
               
    IP H ER BB SO  

 

Joe Dobson 9 9 3 6 1  

 

 

         

 

 

 

1948 AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS

 

 

BOSTON RED SOX 88 52 -

 

 

New York Yankees 87 53 1

 

 

Cleveland Indians 86 55 2 1/2

 

 

Philadelphia Athletics 82 61 7 1/2

 

 

Detroit Tigers 68 70 19

 

 

St. Louis Browns 55 83 32

 

 

Washington Senators 49 94 40 1/2

 

 

Chicago White Sox 46 93 41 1/2