1987 BOSTON RED SOX ...
75 YEARS & A FENWAY HANGOVER ...
 

Jerry Adair   Dick Howser   Travis Jackson   Don McMahon
Died: May 31st   Died: June 17th   Died: July 27th   Died: July 22nd
Buster Posey   Felix Doubront   Josh Reddick   Sean O'Sullivan
Born: Mar 27th   Born: Oct 23rd   Born: Feb 19th   Born: Sept 1st



1987 was another year that saw the Red Sox trying to shake off the hangover from a heartbreaking collapse. The ’86 team let a World Series title slip through their grasp. But while 1986 was more heartbreaking, it was also just a case of a disastrous sequence of four at-bats undoing a tremendous year and losing to the 108-win Mets. But a hangover’s still a hangover and the 1987 Red Sox dragged their own unique set of baggage into the "Season After".  The fans still turned out, but with an air of cynicism and expected disappointment.

Apart from letting free agents Tony Armas, Sammy Stewart, Dave Stapleton and Tom Seaver walk away, the front office made few moves.  The guilty parties of the year before remained (Buckner, Schiraldi, Stanley and McNamara) and the fans were  not in a forgiving mood.  After the 1986 season Roger Clemens received the first of his five "Cy Young" Awards and John McNamara had been named "Manager of the Year", but it was the legacy of 1986 that mattered the most in Boston.

Catcher Rich Gedman, a vital part of the pennant-winning team the year before and one of the game’s better catchers filed for free agency in January and was in a contract holdout and missed the first month of the season. Gedman enjoyed a quality season in 1986 but didn't receive a single offer when he entered free agency. He was more or less forced to re-sign with the Red Sox and couldn't even do that until May 1st because of the rules of free agency. It was later determined that Major League Baseball owners had engaged in collusion to keep salaries low, and Gedman, along with a number of other players, received a settlement payment. To make matters worse, his replacement was the son of team president Haywood Sullivan. When Marc Sullivan hit .198 in his sixty games, no one was feeling better about any potential nepotism going on at Fenway.

Roger Clemens, meanwhile, turned down a $500,000 contract and walked out of spring training, demanding more money from the team as part of a holdout. Oil Can Boyd got a sore shoulder and began the collapse that would ultimately get him into treatment for a drug problem. Jim Rice’s career descent became painfully obvious in ’87. While his home runs had been dipping each year for the past four seasons, they plummeted to 13 for the first time. He also became a liability playing in the spacious outfields of other ball parks. It was a sign the end had come.

Boyd wasn’t the only pitcher struggling. Bruce Hurst might have been taking the ball every fifth day, but he pitched well at home, and poorly on the road, with a 15-13 record and 4.41 ERA. He wasn’t really #2 caliber, which is where he was situated behind Roger Clemens. Al Nipper, the fourth starter on the pennant-winning team, had a bloated 5.43 ERA and Bob Stanley fell apart. The “Steamer” went 4-15 with a 5.01 ERA. The bullpen had no one reliable, as Calvin Schiraldi never got his confidence back following the Game #6 loss in Shea Stadium.

Dwight Evans began playing first base after a career as one of the game’s best defensive right-fielders.  He had a great year at the plate and batted .305 with 34 home runs. On the other side of the infield, Wade Boggs churned out a proto-type .363 batting average and an on-base percentage of .461. Boggs also had a surprising power surge, with 24 home runs. The long ball was up all over baseball, giving rise to suspicion that the ball was juiced. No one knows for sure, but with Boggs’ power coming and going so quickly, it does lend credence to the idea that the ball might have been wound a little tighter than normal in 1987.

A rookie centerfielder named Ellis Burks played respectably and set the stage for a solid career. Mike Greenwell played a variety of positions, hit 19 home runs and had a .386 on-base percentage and one year later would be the team’s best everyday player.

The Sox started the season without Clemens, Boyd or Gedman, and Bob Stanley was the Red Sox starter on Opening Day.

After a disappointing season-opening road trip, by losing three to the Brewers, Bruce Hurst won the home opener with a 3-0, three-hitter on April 10th. Clemens eventually signed for $2 million and made his 1987 debut the following game, promptly surrendering four runs in four innings. When he was removed from the game, he received hearty boos from the Fenway Park crowd who was still angry about the right-hander's holdout.

Clemens lost his first two starts then he got back on track with a three-hitter in an 8-0 victory over the estimable Kansas City Royals at Fenway on April 21st. He had a no-hitter after six and had retired 16 straight. The next night, Bob Stanley flushed the Royals, allowing only four hits in a 1-0 victory. It was his first shutout since 1980.

The Red Sox went on the road at the end of the month and got mired in a slump that saw them swept in Texas and Oakland. But they came out thundering in the Kingdome on April 29th and beat the Mariners 11-5. Mike Greenwell filled in for injured Jim Rice and after getting just one hit in his first 11 at-bats (nine games), he knocked out 3 hits and came through with flying colors, drilling in 4 RBIs.

ELLIS BURKS

On May 1st, in Anaheim, on a night when the Red Sox could have very well fallen into the well, it was the rookie outfielder, Ellis Burks, who collected three hits and provided the spark for a 12-3 victory over the California Angels. Burks had two doubles, a single and a walk in his second game with the Red Sox. And let it be recorded that his first major league hit not only drove in a pair of runs, but set the pace for a night in which the Red Sox offense was clicking on all nine cylinders.

But the Sox won only two of their ten games on the road trip, having left home 5 1/2 games out and coming back to Fenway on May 4th, 10 1/2 games behind.

With Bruce Hurst (3-3) throwing his second shutout of the year, on May 5th when the Sox returned, the Red Sox went after the Athletics with a 10-hit attack. Greenwell and Dwight Evans each drove in a pair of runs in a display of timely hitting. Hurst was a giant star in throwing his third complete game and striking out 14, tying a career high. He scattered five hits and finished with 10 or more strikeouts for the 11th time in his career, third only to Smoky Joe Wood (18) and Roger Clemens (13) on the all-time Red Sox list.

Then on May 6th, Greenwell blasted a three-run homer in the seventh to lead the Sox to a 6-2 decision over Oakland.

Returning to the Shea chamber of horrors on May 7th, for the first time since losing the World Series, the Sox dropped a 2-0 decision to the World Champs in the name of the Jimmy Fund. Memories of '86 could not be blocked out. Bill Buckner's presence was not the only reminder of October's horrors, and since the Sox don’t routinely visit Shea, most of the players associated the stadium with the World Series and nothing else.

Back at Fenway on May 8th, Dwight Evans came through in the clutch with a three-run shot in the eighth inning that broke a 3-3 tie against the Angels. Bruce Hurst’s 8-0 shutout on May 10th against the Angels was his third of the year, becoming the first Sox lefthander since Bill Lee (1975) to pitch back-to-back shutouts.

Led by an Ellis Burks grand slam, and a three-run shot by Marty Barrett, the Sox came from behind on May 25th against the Indians, after watching Bruce Hurst lose the grip of a 6-0 lead. They bounded back with Burks' fourth homer of the year, and the first grand slam of his career.

Roger Clemens, strong, confident and a man who knows exactly what to do with even the most meager lead, treated the Fenway Faithful to a 1-0 victory over the Cleveland Indians on May 27th. This was one of those overpowering nights that every American League opponent dreaded. Clemens blazed away with a fastball clocked at 94-97 miles an hour for his second shutout.  His six-hit masterpiece made the most of the run the Sox gave him in the fifth inning, pitching out of jams in the sixth and eighth and showing the form that a year ago produced an 8-0 record at this same stage of the season.

Dwight Evans led the way with three hits, including his 299th career homer in a 12-8 victory over Cleveland the next night, May 28th. For the fourth time in his 15-year career, he drove in six runs and sparked the Red Sox' comeback from a 6-1 deficit as they completed a four-game sweep of the last-place Indians. He overshadowed a historic performance by Cleveland's Joe Carter, who became the first visitor ever to post two three-homer games at Fenway.

On June 2nd, the Sox came from behind again. After seemingly gift-rapping the game for the Twins, the Red Sox snatched it back at the last minute as Bill Buckner's two-out, two-run single in the bottom of the ninth inning off Minnesota relief ace Jeff Reardon lifted the Red Sox to a 6-5 victory. Calvin Schiraldi, who entered a tie game in the eighth inning, had uncorked a wild pitch to give Minnesota the lead.

MIKE GREENWELL

Then on the next night, June 3rd, the Red Sox pulled out a 7-6, 10-inning victory over the Twins, who left town wondering if they'd awakened a sleeping giant. The Sox once trailed in this contest, 6-2. But this last-gasp revival included Mike Greenwell's game-tying two-run homer in the ninth and Wade Boggs' game-winning single in the 10th that brought a happy ending for the Fenway Park fans.

In Baltimore, Ellis Burks hit his second grand slam of the year as part of a two-homer, seven-RBI performance that led the way to a 15-4 rout of the Orioles. In the sixth, second baseman Marty Barrett slammed one over the left-field fence for his second career grand slam, punctuating a three-game sweep for the Sox on June 10th. So the opportunity was there for the ’87 Sox to make a run at redemption, and if nothing else, have a good season.

They next went to Detroit and it was just the place to make such a stand, and leapfrog the team directly in front of them. But Clemens was hammered late in the game of the series opener and that 11-4 loss was the start of a series sweep. A series loss at Cleveland followed and the Sox were 11 1/2 games out of first.

The Sox tried to right the ship and Clemens got back on track. The right-hander would follow that track to 20 wins and a second straight Cy Young Award, by beating the Yankees in a June home game that won a series. Boyd won his only game of the year a day later against the Brewers, who were on their way to 93 wins. The six weeks leading up to the end of July followed this pattern. There was a burst of hope followed by a sequence of losses and a record that never got real separation from .500. There was little joy in the Sox clubhouse.

One of their nice wins took place on June 23rd. The Sox came back from a 5-0 deficit, streaking to a 9-5 victory over the Milwaukee Brewers, paced by Ellis Burks' three-run homer in the sixth. They also had a key two-run single by Jim Rice in that inning to break a 5-5 tie.

It was all Wade Boggs on June 29th and 30th against the Orioles. In the first game of the series, Boggs' blasted his second career grand slam, a sixth-inning shot that put the frosting on the Sox seventh victory in nine games. He also had a single in the first inning and a triple in the fourth, which gave him a career-high seven runs batted in for the night. The next night a bunch of timely runs in the fifth and sixth wiped out a 7-4 Baltimore lead. What the Sox got in the process, was an even higher level of hitting proficiency from Boggs (3 for 3 with two walks), who inched his American League-leading average up to .391.

Spike Owen came back to haunt the Seattle Mariners on July 11th in the Kingdome. Owen drove in one run and scored another in the ninth inning as the Sox broke a 4-4 tie and took a 7-4 victory, ending a six-game losing streak on the west coast.

Going into the All Star break, the Red Sox were 26-13 at home; no team in baseball had fewer home losses. However, the Sox were 15-34 on the road; no team in baseball has more road losses. Sox pitchers allowed 22 homers during the 3-8 West Coast trip. The Red Sox had baseball's worst catching corps in the first half of the 1987 season. leaving people wondering if Rich Gedman would ever be the same. The Sox bullpen had nine saves, fewest in baseball. Joe Sambito didn't save a game in the first half. Steve Crawford got hurt just when he finally was starting to pitch well, but it was more bad news when Bruce Hurst said his shoulder was hurting.

SAM HORN

After the All Star break, the Oakland A's came to Fenway and on July 18th, after Jim Rice's ninth-inning homer brought the Red Sox into a 3-3 tie, Dave Henderson stepped to the plate in the 10th and cranked a two-run blast into the right-field seats to hand the Sox a 5-3 victory. Ninth-inning homers and Henderson blasts. All from a time not too long ago.

On July 25th, it took precisely 109 minutes and five innings for rookie, Sam Horn, to achieve cult status in his new hometown. With the score 5-5 in the bottom of the fifth, Horn drove a hanging slider into the left-field net and the Red Sox were en route to a 19-hit, 11-5 victory over the Mariners. Horn was summoned for a curtain call in his first major league game. 

The Sox didn't need most of the 16-hit explosion in an 11-1 demolition of the Seattle Mariners on July 27th. Roger Clemens struck out 14 Mariners, including the side in three innings. The Rocket had not allowed nary an earned run in his last two starts, both of which had been complete-game victories.

But while a team built on a superstar pitcher and a hall-of-fame hitter, along with a couple everyday players having great years, might be exciting in a short series, it was hell over the long haul and hell is exactly where the ’87 Sox took their fans on a West Coast swing to begin August.

Ellis Burks wielded a hot bat for the Sox at the plate.  Going into August, he had hit safely in 18 of 20 games at .344 (32-93). In just eight games, Sam Horn had hit five homers and at a .433 clip (13 for 30) with 10 runs batted in.  But for Rich Gedman the story was different. The worst season of his career came to a close, as the Red Sox catcher underwent surgery on his left thumb. Oil Can Boyd also found that he suffered a small ligament tear, that required surgery to repair.

Against exclusively mediocre-to-awful teams, The Sox lost two of three in Oakland, were swept by the Angels and could only split a four-game set at lowly Seattle. Playing the same teams back at home immediately thereafter went little better and when the record hit 43-51 it was all over but the shouting.

However, Dwight Evans was having a marvelous 1987 season, and in Texas on August 4th, staring at another demoralizing defeat, the Sox were saved by the booming bat of Evans. Dewey hit a pair of home runs, including the game-winner in the ninth inning for an 8-6 victory over the Rangers. His first blast, a three-run shot, put the Sox ahead, 5-4, in the sixth. The second, a two-run job in the ninth, brought the Sox back from a 6-5 deficit.

JOHN MARZANO

Then back at Fenway, with a workmanlike complete game performance against the Rangers, Bruce Hurst (14-6) raised his home record to 11-1 on the year and 9-0 in his last 11 starts on August 14th.

Rookie catcher John Marzano, taking the catching spot for the injured Rich Gedman, belted two homers and collected four RBIs on August 16th against the Rangers, pacing the Sox in a 12-2 trashing. Marzano finished 3 for 4, with his two homers and four RBIs.

On August 31st, Dwight Evans posted a career-high 33 homers and 109 runs batted in. His two homers and four RBIs led a 15-hit attack in Cleveland and pushed Roger Clemens and the Red Sox to a 7-3 victory.

The Sox was active at the September trade deadline, but they were sellers in 1987. Don Baylor, the veteran DH with 16 home runs, was traded to Minnesota where he got the World Series ring that narrowly eluded him a year earlier. Dave Henderson, one year after being an ALCS hero and an almost-World Series hero, was shipped out to San Francisco where he played on a division-winning team. To make room for Sam Horn, the Sox had already released Bill Buckner, who was picked up by the Angels.

In the ninth inning of the game on September 12th, Ellis Burks stole second easily and, two seconds later, had scored the deciding run in the Red Sox' 4-3 victory over the Baltimore Orioles. Burks’ decision to steal was with the American League's leading batter, Wade Boggs, at the plate in a tie game. Burks' speed worked successfully, but it took a skipping ground-ball single off Boggs' bat that just eluded the glove of diving first baseman, Eddie Murray, for the Sox to finish the job and defeat the Orioles.

DWIGHT EVANS

Mike Greenwell was hitting .374 (58 for 155) since the All-Star Game, increasing his batting average by a whopping 33 points to a man-sized .340 and was acquiring something of a reputation as a guy who not only hits the ball often, but a guy who hits the ball hard.  But Mark McGwire would be the American League Rookie of the Year. He'd already hit 41 homers and been on the cover of USA Today.

On September 20th, the Red Sox beat the Orioles at Memorial Stadium, in straight sets, 5-1 and 6-3. Roger Clemens shut down the Birds on three hits in the opener. Clemens fanned nine while going the route. He threw high octane for nine inning, walking three.

Sam Horn hit a solo homer (No. 11) in the second, John Marzano singled home Spike Owen in the fifth and Dwight Evans crushed a three-run homer in the eighth (No. 34).

The Yankees got a taste of Roger Clemens, on September 30th, as he overpowered them with a 13-strikeout, 7-0 dispatch for his 19th victory and sixth shutout of the season.

ROGER CLEMENS

Then, in an extra-inning pitching duel that evolved into a classic Mexican standoff, the Sox, Jeff Sellers matched Milwaukee's Teddy Higuera pitch for pitch, going a career-high 11 innings in his final mound appearance of the season. Spike Owen made Sellers' effort worthwhile when he hit his second homer of the season over the Green Monster, lifting the Red Sox to a 3-2, 12-inning victory.

And finally, Clemens (20-9) completed his 1987 Cy Young resume. He finished a 16-3 run with a commanding, 4-0, two-hit, 12-strikeout demonstration of pitching superiority over the Milwaukee Brewers in the final game of the season.

The victory was his 20th of the season, thus making him the first man since Tommy John in 1979-80 to register back-to-back 20-win seasons in the American League. The shutout was his seventh, and that led both leagues. The complete game was No. 18, and that also led the major leagues. He finished second in innings pitched (281 2/3), third in ERA (2.97) and tied for first in wins with Oakland's Dave Stewart. The 12 strikeouts gave him 256, trailing only Seattle's Mark Langston (by six).

All in all, the 1987 team fared poorly and couldn't even win half their games. After a title run the year before, the 1987 Red Sox slumped to a 78-84 record, leaving the club 20 games behind the first-place Tigers in 5th place.


 

 

 

GAME LOG
  RECORD PLACE GB/GF OPPONENT   SCORE  PITCHER W/L
04/06/1987 0-1 5th -1  at Milwaukee Brewers L 5-1 Bob Stanley 0-1
04/07/1987 0-1 5th -1  
04/08/1987 0-2 5th -2  at Milwaukee Brewers L 3-2 Wes Gardner 0-1
04/09/1987 0-3 7th -3  at Milwaukee Brewers L 12-11 Steve Crawford 0-1
04/10/1987 1-3 6th -3  Toronto Blue Jays W 3-0 Bruce Hurst 1-0
04/11/1987 1-4 6th -4  Toronto Blue Jays L 11-1 Roger Clemens 0-1
04/12/1987 2-4 6th -4  Toronto Blue Jays W 8-3 Bob Stanley 1-1
04/13/1987 2-4 6th -4 1/2  Texas Rangers pp  
04/14/1987 3-4 6th -4 1/2  Texas Rangers W 4-1 Al Nipper 1-0
04/15/1987 4-4 4th -4 1/2  Texas Rangers W 5-4 Bruce Hurst 2-0
04/16/1987 4-5 6th -5  at Toronto Blue Jays L 4-2 Roger Clemens 0-2
04/17/1987 4-6 6th -6  at Toronto Blue Jays L 10-5 Bob Stanley 1-2
04/18/1987 5-6 6th -6  at Toronto Blue Jays W 6-4 Jeff Sellers 1-0
04/19/1987 6-6 5th -6  at Toronto Blue Jays W 4-1 Al Nipper 2-0
04/20/1987 6-7 6th -7  Kansas City Royals L 10-2 Bruce Hurst 2-1
04/21/1987 7-7 3rd -6  Kansas City Royals W 8-0 Roger Clemens 1-2
04/22/1987 8-7 3rd -5 1/2  Kansas City Royals W 1-0 Bob Stanley 2-2
04/23/1987 8-7 3rd -5 1/2  
04/24/1987 8-8 4th -6 1/2  at Texas Rangers L 6-4 Calvin Schiraldi 0-1
04/25/1987 8-9 4th -7 1/2  at Texas Rangers L 2-1 Bruce Hurst 2-2
04/26/1987 8-10 4th -8 1/2  at Texas Rangers L 5-3 Calvin Schiraldi 0-2
04/27/1987 8-11 4th -9 1/2  at Oakland Athletics L 5-2 Bob Stanley 2-3
04/28/1987 8-12 5th -9 1/2  at Oakland Athletics L 7-1 Jeff Sellers 1-1
04/29/1987 9-12 4th -9 1/2  at Seattle Mariners W 11-5 Al Nipper 3-0
04/30/1987 9-13 4th -9 1/2  at Seattle Mariners L 11-2 Bruce Hurst 2-3
05/01/1987 10-13 4th -9 1/2  at California Angels W 12-3 Roger Clemens 2-2
05/02/1987 10-14 4th -10 1/2  at California Angels L 4-2 Bob Stanley 2-4
05/03/1987 10-15 4th -10 1/2  at California Angels L 11-4 Al Nipper 3-1
05/04/1987 10-15 4th -10 1/2  
05/05/1987 11-15 4th -9 1/2  Oakland Athletics W 6-0 Bruce Hurst 3-3
05/06/1987 12-15 4th -8 1/2  Oakland Athletics W 6-2 Calvin Schiraldi 1-2
05/07/1987 12-15 4th -8 1/2  at New York Mets L 2-0  
05/08/1987 13-15 4th -7 1/2  California Angels W 6-4 Joe Sambito 1-0
05/09/1987 13-16 4th -7 1/2  California Angels L 8-1 Al Nipper 3-2
05/10/1987 14-16 4th -6 1/2  California Angels W 8-0 Bruce Hurst 4-3
05/11/1987 14-17 4th -7  Seattle Mariners L 4-3 Roger Clemens 2-3
05/12/1987 15-17 4th -6  Seattle Mariners W 3-2 Mike Trujillo 2-2
05/13/1987 15-18 4th -6  Seattle Mariners L 5-4 Joe Sambito 1-1
05/14/1987 15-18 5th -6 1/2  
05/15/1987 15-19 5th -7 1/2  at Minnesota Twins L 3-1 Bruce Hurst 4-4
05/16/1987 16-19 5th -6 1/2  at Minnesota Twins W 6-1 Roger Clemens 3-3
05/17/1987 16-20 6th -7 1/2  at Minnesota Twins L 10-8 Calvin Schiraldi 1-3
05/18/1987 16-21 6th -8 1/2  at Kansas City Royals L 4-2 Al Nipper 3-3
05/19/1987 16-22 6th -8 1/2  at Kansas City Royals L 4-1 Bob Stanley 2-5
05/20/1987 17-22 6th -7 1/2  at Kansas City Royals W 7-1 Bruce Hurst 5-4
05/21/1987 17-22 6th -7 1/2  
05/22/1987 17-23 6th -8 1/2  Chicago White Sox L 4-3 Roger Clemens 3-4
05/23/1987 17-24 6th -9 1/2  Chicago White Sox L 9-1 Al Nipper 3-4
05/24/1987 17-25 6th -10 1/2  Chicago White Sox L 4-1 Bob Stanley 2-6
05/25/1987 18-25 6th -10 1/2  Cleveland Indians W 10-6 Steve Crawford 1-1
05/26/1987 19-25 6th -10  Cleveland Indians W 6-5 Al Nipper 4-4
05/27/1987 20-25 6th -9  Cleveland Indians W 1-0 Roger Clemens 4-4
05/28/1987 21-25 6th -9  Cleveland Indians W 12-8 Steve Crawford 2-1
05/29/1987 21-26 6th -9  at Chicago White Sox L 8-6 Bob Stanley 2-7
05/30/1987 21-27 6th -9  at Chicago White Sox L 3-2 Wes Gardner 0-2
05/31/1987 22-27 6th -9  at Chicago White Sox W 10-9 Calvin Schiraldi 2-3
06/01/1987 22-28 6th -9  Minnesota Twins L 9-5 Roger Clemens 4-5
06/02/1987 23-28 6th -9  Minnesota Twins W 6-5 Calvin Schiraldi 3-3
06/03/1987 24-28 6th -9  Minnesota Twins W 7-6 Calvin Schiraldi 4-3
06/04/1987 25-28 6th -8  Detroit Tigers W 8-5 Bruce Hurst 6-4
06/05/1987 25-29 6th -9  Detroit Tigers L 4-2 Al Nipper 4-5
06/06/1987 25-30 6th -9  Detroit Tigers L 5-3 Wes Gardner 0-3
06/07/1987 25-31 6th -10  Detroit Tigers L 18-8 John Leister 0-1
06/08/1987 26-31 6th -9 1/2  at Baltimore Orioles W 6-2 Bob Stanley 3-7
06/09/1987 27-31 6th -9 1/2  at Baltimore Orioles W 2-1 Bruce Hurst 7-4
06/10/1987 28-31 6th -9 1/2  at Baltimore Orioles W 15-4 Al Nipper 5-5
06/11/1987 28-31 6th -10  
06/12/1987 28-32 5th -11  at Detroit Tigers L 11-4 Roger Clemens 4-6
06/13/1987 28-33 5th -12  at Detroit Tigers L 6-4 Steve Crawford 2-2
06/14/1987 28-34 5th -12  at Detroit Tigers L 2-1 Bruce Hurst 7-5
06/15/1987 28-34 5th -11 1/2  
06/16/1987 28-35 5th -12 1/2  at Cleveland Indians L 8-7 Al Nipper 5-6
06/17/1987 29-35 5th -11 1/2  at Cleveland Indians W 4-0 Roger Clemens 5-6
06/18/1987 29-36 5th -11 1/2  at Cleveland Indians L 7-5 Bob Stanley 3-8
06/19/1987 29-37 5th -12 1/2  New York Yankees L 10-5 Joe Sambito 1-2
06/20/1987 30-37 5th -11 1/2  New York Yankees W 9-4 Al Nipper 6-6
06/21/1987 31-37 5th -11 1/2  New York Yankees W 4-2 Roger Clemens 6-6
06/22/1987 32-37 5th -10 1/2  Milwaukee Brewers W 5-2 Oil Can Boyd 1-0
06/23/1987 33-37 5th -10 1/2  Milwaukee Brewers W 9-5 Steve Crawford 3-2
06/24/1987 34-37 5th -10 1/2  Milwaukee Brewers W 8-7 Bruce Hurst 8-5
06/25/1987 34-37 5th -10 1/2  
06/26/1987 34-38 5th -10 1/2  at New York Yankees L 12-11 Calvin Schiraldi 4-4
06/27/1987 34-39 5th -11 1/2  at New York Yankees L 9-1 Oil Can Boyd 1-1
06/28/1987 35-39 5th -10 1/2  at New York Yankees W 6-2 Al Nipper 7-6
06/29/1987 36-39 5th -10 1/2  Baltimore Orioles W 14-3 Bruce Hurst 9-5
06/30/1987 37-39 5th -10 1/2  Baltimore Orioles W 13-9 Steve Crawford 4-2
07/01/1987 38-39 5th -10 1/2  Baltimore Orioles W 6-2 Roger Clemens 7-6
07/02/1987 38-40 5th -11  at Oakland Athletics L 5-3 Al Nipper 7-7
07/03/1987 39-40 5th -10 1/2  at Oakland Athletics W 2-0 Jeff Sellers 3-1
07/04/1987 39-41 5th -11 1/2  at Oakland Athletics L 9-5 Bruce Hurst 9-6
07/05/1987 39-42 5th -11 1/2  at Oakland Athletics L 6-3 Oil Can Boyd 1-2
07/06/1987 39-43 5th -11 1/2  at California Angels L 10-7 Wes Gardner 0-4
07/07/1987 39-44 5th -12 1/2  at California Angels L 9-4 Al Nipper 7-8
07/08/1987 39-45 5th -13 1/2  at California Angels L 5-3 Jeff Sellers 3-2
07/09/1987 39-46 5th -13 1/2  at Seattle Mariners L 11-5 Wes Gardner 0-5
07/10/1987 40-46 5th -13 1/2  at Seattle Mariners W 7-4 Calvin Schiraldi 5-4
07/11/1987 41-46 5th -12 1/2  at Seattle Mariners W 10-4 Roger Clemens 8-6
07/12/1987 41-47 5th -13 1/2  at Seattle Mariners L 6-1 Al Nipper 7-9
07/13/1987 All Star Game Break
07/14/1987
07/15/1987
07/16/1987 41-48 5th -14 1/2  Oakland Athletics L 6-3 Roger Clemens 8-7
07/17/1987 41-49 5th -15 1/2  Oakland Athletics L 11-6 Bob Stanley 3-9
07/18/1987 42-49 5th -14 1/2  Oakland Athletics W 5-3 Bruce Hurst 10-6
07/19/1987 42-50 5th -14 1/2  Oakland Athletics L 5-3 Bob Stanley 3-10
07/20/1987 42-51 5th -15 1/2  California Angels L 3-2 Jeff Sellers 3-3
07/21/1987 43-51 5th -14 1/2  California Angels W 3-0 Roger Clemens 9-7
07/22/1987 43-52 5th -14 1/2  California Angels L 6-5 Oil Can Boyd 1-3
07/23/1987 43-52 5th -14 1/2  
07/24/1987 44-52 5th -13 1/2  Seattle Mariners W 5-4 Bruce Hurst 11-6
07/25/1987 45-52 5th -12 1/2  Seattle Mariners W 11-5 Tom Bolton 1-0
07/26/1987 46-52 5th -12 1/2  Seattle Mariners W 11-1 Roger Clemens 10-7
07/27/1987 46-53 5th -13  at Toronto Blue Jays L 10-8 Calvin Schiraldi 5-5
07/28/1987 46-54 5th -14  at Toronto Blue Jays L 5-4 Joe Sambito 1-3
07/29/1987 47-54 5th -14  at Toronto Blue Jays W 6-5 Calvin Schiraldi 6-5
07/30/1987 47-54 5th -14 1/2  
07/31/1987 48-54 5th -14 1/2  at Kansas City Royals W 4-0 Roger Clemens 11-7
08/01/1987 48-55 5th -14 1/2  at Kansas City Royals L 4-0 Jeff Sellers 3-4
08/02/1987 48-56 5th -15 1/2  at Kansas City Royals L 13-5 Bob Stanley 3-11
08/03/1987 49-56 5th -14 1/2  at Texas Rangers W 11-2 Bruce Hurst 12-6
08/04/1987 50-56 5th -13 1/2  at Texas Rangers W 8-6 Calvin Schiraldi 7-5
08/05/1987 50-57 5th -14 1/2  at Texas Rangers L 9-8 Joe Sambito 1-4
08/06/1987 50-57 5th -14 1/2  
08/07/1987 51-57 5th -13 1/2  Kansas City Royals W 4-3 Jeff Sellers 4-4
08/08/1987 52-57 5th -13  Kansas City Royals W 8-3 Bruce Hurst 13-6
08/09/1987 52-58 5th -13 1/2  Kansas City Royals L 8-3 Steve Crawford 4-3
08/10/1987 53-58 5th -12 1/2  Toronto Blue Jays W 9-1 Roger Clemens 12-7
08/11/1987 53-59 5th -13 1/2  Toronto Blue Jays L 8-3 Bob Stanley 3-12
08/12/1987 53-60 5th -14 1/2  Toronto Blue Jays L 10-4 Jeff Sellers 4-5
08/13/1987 53-60 5th -14  
08/14/1987 54-60 5th -14  Texas Rangers W 9-3 Bruce Hurst 14-6
54-61 5th -14 1/2 L 9-4 Al Nipper 7-10
08/15/1987 55-61 5th -13 1/2  Texas Rangers W 7-6 Wes Gardner 1-5
08/16/1987 56-61 5th -13 1/2  Texas Rangers W 12-2 Bob Stanley 4-12
08/17/1987 56-62 5th -14  at Chicago White Sox L 2-1 Jeff Sellers 4-6
08/18/1987 57-62 5th -14  at Chicago White Sox W 14-8 Al Nipper 8-10
08/19/1987 57-63 5th -14 1/2  at Chicago White Sox L 8-3 Bruce Hurst 14-7
08/20/1987 57-63 5th -14 1/2  
08/21/1987 58-63 5th -13 1/2  Minnesota Twins W 11-3 Roger Clemens 13-7
08/22/1987 59-63 5th -13 1/2  Minnesota Twins W 6-5 Calvin Schiraldi 8-5
08/23/1987 60-63 5th -13 1/2  Minnesota Twins W 6-4 Jeff Sellers 5-6
08/24/1987 60-64 5th -13 1/2  Chicago White Sox L 6-3 Bruce Hurst 14-8
08/25/1987 61-64 5th -13 1/2  Chicago White Sox W 7-3 Steve Crawford 5-3
08/26/1987 61-65 5th -14 1/2  Chicago White Sox L 5-3 Roger Clemens 13-8
08/27/1987 61-65 5th -14 1/2  at Pawtucket Red Sox pp  
08/28/1987 61-65 5th -14  at Cleveland Indians pp  
08/29/1987 61-66 5th -15  at Cleveland Indians L 7-2 Bob Stanley 4-13
61-67 5th -15 1/2 L 2-1 Bruce Hurst 14-9
08/30/1987 62-67 5th -15 1/2  at Cleveland Indians W 7-3 Roger Clemens 14-8
08/31/1987 62-67 5th -15  
09/01/1987 63-67 5th -15  at Minnesota Twins W 9-0 Jeff Sellers 6-6
09/02/1987 63-68 5th -16  at Minnesota Twins L 5-4 Al Nipper 8-11
09/03/1987 63-69 5th -17  at Minnesota Twins L 2-1 Wes Gardner 1-6
09/04/1987 64-69 5th -17  Cleveland Indians W 5-2 Roger Clemens 15-8
09/05/1987 64-70 5th -17  Cleveland Indians L 15-2 Bob Stanley 4-14
09/06/1987 64-71 5th -17 1/2  Cleveland Indians L 3-1 Jeff Sellers 6-7
09/07/1987 64-72 5th -18 1/2  New York Yankees L 9-5 Bruce Hurst 14-10
09/08/1987 65-72 5th -17 1/2  New York Yankees W 8-6 Al Nipper 9-11
09/09/1987 66-72 5th -18  New York Yankees W 5-3 Roger Clemens 16-8
09/10/1987 67-72 5th -17  Baltimore Orioles W 5-4 Joe Sambito 2-4
09/11/1987 68-72 5th -16  Baltimore Orioles W 9-3 Jeff Sellers 7-7
09/12/1987 69-72 5th -16  Baltimore Orioles W 4-3 Bruce Hurst 15-10
09/13/1987 69-72 5th -16 1/2  Baltimore Orioles pp  
09/14/1987 69-73 5th -16 1/2  at Detroit Tigers L 3-0 Roger Clemens 16-9
09/15/1987 69-74 5th -17 1/2  at Detroit Tigers L 9-8 Steve Crawford 5-4
09/16/1987 69-75 5th -18 1/2  at Detroit Tigers L 4-1 Jeff Sellers 7-8
09/17/1987 69-75 5th -18 1/2  
09/18/1987 69-76 5th -19 1/2  at Baltimore Orioles L 9-4 Bruce Hurst 15-11
70-76 5th -19 W 10-7 Rob Woodward 1-0
09/19/1987 70-76 5th -19 1/2  at Baltimore Orioles pp  
09/20/1987 71-76 5th -18 1/2  at Baltimore Orioles W 5-1 Roger Clemens 17-9
72-76 5th -18 W 6-3 Wes Gardner 2-6
09/21/1987 73-76 5th -17 1/2  Detroit Tigers W 9-4 Al Nipper 10-11
09/22/1987 73-77 5th -18 1/2  Detroit Tigers L 8-5 Rob Woodward 1-1
09/23/1987 73-78 5th -19 1/2  Detroit Tigers L 4-0 Bruce Hurst 15-12
09/24/1987 73-79 5th -20 1/2  at Milwaukee Brewers L 7-6 Joe Sambito 2-5
09/25/1987 74-79 5th -20 1/2  at Milwaukee Brewers W 9-2 Roger Clemens 18-9
09/26/1987 74-80 5th -21 1/2  at Milwaukee Brewers L 3-2 Al Nipper 10-12
09/27/1987 74-81 5th -21 1/2  at Milwaukee Brewers L 9-6 Bob Stanley 4-15
09/28/1987 74-82 5th -21 1/2  at New York Yankees L 9-7 Joe Sambito 2-6
09/29/1987 74-83 5th -21 1/2  at New York Yankees L 6-0 Bruce Hurst 15-13
09/30/1987 75-83 5th -20 1/2  at New York Yankees W 7-0 Roger Clemens 19-9
10/01/1987 76-83 5th -20  at New York Yankees W 7-5 Al Nipper 11-12
10/02/1987 77-83 5th -19  Milwaukee Brewers W 3-2 Wes Gardner 3-6
10/03/1987 77-84 5th -20  Milwaukee Brewers L 8-4 John Leister 0-2
10/04/1987 78-84 5th -20  Milwaukee Brewers W 4-0 Roger Clemens 20-9
 
1987 RED SOX BATTING & PITCHING
 
 

 

 

FINAL 1987 A.L. EAST STANDINGS

 

 

Detroit Tigers

98 64 -

 

 

Toronto Blue Jays

86 66 2

 

 

Milwaukee Brewers

91 71 7

 

 

New York Yankees

89 73 9

 

 

BOSTON RED SOX

78

84

20

 

 

Baltimore Orioles

67 95 31

 

 

Cleveland Indians

61 101 37

 

 

 
1986 RED SOX 1988 RED SOX