The Red Sox come from behind in the 10th inning to win
the first World Series played at Fenway Park

ON THIS DATE (October 16, 1912) ... Words are not enough to describe the outburst of insane enthusiasm that went thundering around Fenway Park when Steve Yerkes crossed the plate with the winning run in the 10th inning.  Men hugged each other.  Women became hysterical and boys threw their caps in the air.  The cheering lasted a full five minutes.  The great New York machine had been disposed of.  The great Christy Mathewson had pitched a remarkable game and was heartbroken with tears rolling down his cheeks.  “Red Sox Win” flashed over the wires to remote corners of America.  The Red Sox were outplayed, outpitched and outfielded, but fate was on their side.  The Sox made four errors that meant nothing as Hugh Bedient continually tightened up and cut down the next batter to end each threat.  For seven innings Bedient held the Giants to just one run.  Both managers had pitchers continually warming up, just in case. 

 

OLAF HENRIKSEN

It was the seventh inning when a brilliant Hugh Bedient was lifted for pinch hitter Olaf Henriksen.  Down one run, with men at first and second and two down, Matty put Henriksen in the hole, two strikes.  Henriksen saw one to his liking and hit a low liner over the third base bag, six inches from the foul line, bringing in Jake Stahl with the tying run. It was a hit that sent the chill down the spines of the Giants.  They had let the Red Sox back in the game.

Joe Wood came back in to try to redeem himself in the next inning, and took the game into the tenth. Red Murray doubled. When Fred Merkle brought him in with a base hit, the Sox fans settled back in their seats with a feeling of dread.  The bottom of the inning came in like a slow fog bank.  Clyde Engel, batting for Wood, came up to a quiet Fenway Park.  He hit a long lazy routine fly ball toward left center that Fred Snodgrass ran down and then it happened.  Snodgrass dropped the ball only to then see it rolling away from him. Engel scampered down to second hearing the music of thousands of yelling fans.  It was now up to Harry Hooper.  The house was rocking. Matty had to, and now did pitch his most skillful ball.  Hooper tried to lay down a bunt, but the ball rolled foul.  He then cut loose and sent another ball to center which Snodgrass reeled in with ease, chasing Engel back to second.  Matty passed Steve Yerkes, electing not to throw him a strike and make him chase something, but Yerkes stayed patient and took first.  Up strode the hero of a thousand battles this year. The man from Texas, Tris Speaker.  The first ball was popped foul between Fred Merkle and Chief Meyers. It was the third out. In came Merkle. Out ran Meyers and Merkle, seeing him coming toward him, hesitated. The fans were screaming and Matty was trying to yell Meyers off.  The Chief didn’t hear him. The ball which should have been the final out, landed between them, sending the crowd into further hysterics. 

 

FRED SNODGRASS

The clearly disturbed Mathewson returned to the mound. Matty curved one toward Speaker’s knees and watched it shot out to right field.  Engle saw it, turned third, and easily scored the tying run ahead of Red Murray’s throw. Yerkes slipped to third on the throw and Speaker moved down to second.  The Giants moved in as Duffy Lewis took his stance.  A long fly would be good enough.  Matty kept the ball low and Lewis didn’t fish … ball four … bases loaded.  Larry Gardner, seeing his plan, took two pitches and then swung and missed.  Matty knew he couldn’t afford to walk in the winning run and threw one inside, well above the knees.  Gardner took a good toehold and did what he had to.  He took the ball up and toward right field.  The second it was hit the crowd started to wind up.  It was the fly ball, the boys needed, to have the winning run score from third.  Josh Devore, who was playing in, caught the ball and fired, but Steve Yerkes dashed for home and scored triumphantly. 

It was over. The Red Sox who hiked the trails in Hot Springs through the rains of the spring, and then sliced through the American League with little resistance, only to finally meet a worthy foe, who they battled for the whole World Series till the last out, were World Champions.



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11912 World Series, Game #8

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W-Joe Wood (3-1)
L-Christy Mathewson (0-2)
Attendance – 17,034

2B-Murray (2)(NY), Herzog (NY), Gardner (Bost),
Henriksen (Bost), Stahl (Bost)