“DIARY OF A WINNER”


 

HIPPO VAUGHN

THE LAST ONE FOR 86 YEARS
 1918 WORLD SERIES, GAME #5

Vaughn beats the Sox after a strike delays the game

September 10, 1918 ... The Chicago Cubs made a 3-0 comeback yesterday against the Red Sox, following the settlement of a players strike. The start of the game was delayed precisely one hour by the strike, behind which was an effort by the players compel the National Commission to increase the amount of the shares that the winning players and losing players are to receive from the World Series receipts. The situation stands, as follows. The players contend that they understood that the winner's share of the World Series came to $2000 each man and the loser's share was $1400 for each man. Based on gate receipts that share was cut to $900 and $300. The players feel that they should not have to suffer because the price of tickets was cut in half over what it was last year.

Since Sunday night the players represented by Harry Hooper and Everett Scott from the Red Sox and Les Mann and Bill Killifer from the Cubs, have been trying to get a conference with the members present from National Commission. In the morning there was a brief meaning, but there was nothing done, as the members of the commission, said they had nothing to do with the apportionment. The commission suggested that the discussion be postponed until after the ballgame and urge that the right thing would be done, and there are the matter ended.

At the ballpark, however, the players got together and decided not to start the game until they had been assured of what they believed to be rightfully theirs. None of the members of either ball club was dressed to play at the time the game was scheduled to begin. Harry Hooper and Les Mann went to the umpires room where President Ban Johnson of the American League and acting President John Heydler of the National League, along with August Herrmann, chairman of the commission came in with the umpires, some newspaper men, and a few interested influential fans.

 

Harry Hooper was the spokesman for the players. He pointed out that he was not the ringleader, but that he was selected to represent the case of the ballplayers who, he said believed they were not being fairly treated. The three executives said that they could not change the conditions under which the receipts of the series should be divided. President Johnson pointed out that if it had not been for his efforts in Washington, there would be no World Series at all.  Mr. Herrmann emphasized again that the commission did not have the power to change the conditions of the allotment.

Pres. Johnson appealed to Harry Hooper and Les Mann to influence the players to go out on the field, in the interest of the game and not to disappoint the assembled fans. The players returned to their respective club rooms, and although the majority of the players were eager to continue the fight, it was finally decided to go out and play the game under protest.

Once the players decided this, ex-mayor Honey Fitzgerald, who was one of those present at the meeting, made the announcement from the field at the game would be played, and that the two clubs would wave their point, in order that the fans would not be disappointed. The game then started and never for a moment was anything shown by the ballplayers that they even thought about the disagreement they were going through.

Lionhearted Jim "Hippo" Vaughn finally came back and whitewashed Sam Jones, who was generous to a fault to the batters from Chicago. It was a game that abounded in brilliant plays, just like the other games of the series. It was worth waiting for Vaughn, because his triumph was well-deserved. He held the Sox to only five scattered hits, and allowed only one base runner to reach second base. It was Vaughn's third time pitching against the Sox, and this time he came through like the ace he is, because he had some support from the Cubs' batters.

Those batters whacked Sam Jones hard. Seven hits and five passes were charged to him, and after the third inning, where he gave up one run he was fine until the eighth, where he gave up two.

 

WOUNDED SOLDIERS WERE GUESTS

Charlie Hollocher hit safely three times, swiped second base and was in on three doubleplays. He also made an outstanding catch off Harry Hooper in the ninth inning, running full tilt toward the left field stands. In that same inning Les Mann raced up the bank in left, after stumbling twice to make a catch, which robbed pinch-hitter Hack Miller of at least a double. Max Flack went up against the fence in right in the first inning for a long foul fly from Whiteman, who himself not only gaffed a tough liner from Dode Paskert in the first inning, but then turned it into a double play by throwing Hollocher out at the plate in the sixth.

Everett Scott made a  star play on Max Flack,, who smashed the ball right at him. It took a crazy hop and caromed high to his left just as he got in front of it, shooting up his left hand up at the last second and snaring and then firing to get the speedy Cub player.

Dave Shean and Scotty were the only Sox players to get to second base. Shean was marooned there in the first, while Scott in the third fell victim to a doubleplay.

In every inning except the fourth, fifth, seventh, and ninth, the Cubs had men on base and only sensational support saved Jones from getting men on in those other frames. There was two out in the third inning when Jones walked Hollocher. Sam Agnew, pegged to McInnis trapping the kid and when Stuffy turned to make the play on him, he found him running full tilt to second base. Hollocher made it to second, while Stuffy was poking around trying to get the ball out of his glove. A double by Mann down the left-field line scored Hollocher make it one to nothing.

In the eighth inning, Flack was passed to start and then took second. Hollocher then laid a beautiful sacrifice bunt down the third base line that stayed fair as he ran to first. Paskert rapped a double off the scoreboard in left field, scoring Flack and Hollocher. Paskert was run down between third and home, trying to score from second on Pick's short hard grounder that caromed off Shean. Shean recovered and Paskert was caught in a rundown between Agnew, Freddie Thomas and Stuffy McInnis, who got him at the plate.

The wounded soldiers who attended today's game were given a great ovation by the crowd. Former manager Bill Carrigan was in attendance and met with his former players. Among other notables at the game were baseball celebrities, Clarence Roland, Pat Moran, and Patsy Donovan.  Donovan sat in a box with James Gaffney ex-owner of the Braves.



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1918 WORLD SERIES

 

 

Boston Red Sox

3 Games

 

 

Chicago Cubs

2 Games

 

 
 

FENWAY PARK

 

BATTER

 

 

0
STRIKES

0
BALLS

0
OUTS

 
 
 

P

C

WORLD SERIES, GAME #5

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

 

R

H

E

 
     

CHICAGO CUBS

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

2

0

   

3

7

0

 
     

BOSTON RED SOX

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

   

0

5

0

 

 

W-Hippo Vaughn (1-2)
L-Sam Jones (0-1)
Attendance - 24,694
2B-Paskert (Chi), Mann (Chi), Strunk (Bost)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CUBS

 

AB

R

H

 

 

Max Flack rf 2 1 0  

 

Charlie Hollocher ss 3 2 3  

 

Les Mann lf 3 0 1  

 

Dode Paskert cf 3 0 1  

 

Fred Merkle 1b 3 0 1  

 

Charlie Pick 2b 4 0 1  

 

Charlie Deal 3b 4 0 0  

 

Bill Killifer c 4 0 0  

 

Hippo Vaughn p 4 0 0  
             
    IP H ER SO  
  Hippo Vaughn 9 5 0 4  

 

 

 

             

 

RED SOX

 

AB

R

H

 

 

Harry Hooper

rf

4 0 1  

 

Dave Shean

2b

3 0 1  

 

Amos Strunk

cf

4 0 1  

 

George Whiteman

lf

3 0 1  

 

Stuffy McInnis

1b

3 0 0  

 

Everett Scott

ss

3 0 0  

 

Fred Thomas

3b

3 0 1  
 

Sam Agnew

c

2 0 0  
 

Wally Schang

ph/c

1 0 0  
 

Sam Jones

p

1 0 0  
 

Hack Miller

ph

1 0 0  
             
    IP H ER SO  
  Sam Jones 9 7 3 5