“DIARY OF A WINNER”


 

GEORGE WHITEMAN

THE LAST ONE FOR 86 YEARS
 1918 WORLD SERIES, GAME #6

The Red Sox win their 5th World Championship

September 11, 1918 ... Boston is once again the capital of the baseball world as the Red Sox defeated the Cubs 2 to1 at Fenway Park in front of only 15,238 fans. The weather was far from ideal, but the disagreement between the National Commission and the contesting players, which held up the start of yesterday's game, was the thing that kept the public away yesterday.

With minds wandering in different directions, it can plainly be seen that it was a fatal mistake for baseball players to argue over dollars. Money differences and further strike talk were forgotten yesterday and the teams fought valiantly Cubs manager Mitchell, who realized that it was do or die, trotted out southpaw Lefty Tyler again, while Ed Barrow pinned his hopes on Carl Mays. If not for Tyler's wildness, the Sox making a run in the 3rd inning would not have been possible.

It was a ball game that nobody who was present will forget. It left many lasting impressions. It was lost on a muffed ball, but there were so many sensational plays before the contest was finally decided, that hopefully fans will look back and not dwell on how it was lost.

Not much can be added in the conversation about the sensational play from George Whiteman. The career minor leaguer who got his chance on the big stage, has been the ace of the series, and when baseball is resumed, he may not answer the roll call because he is approaching 34 years old and after the war, may not be able to knock aside those obstacles that the gathering years will toss in his path.

 

His catch on pinch-hitter Rollie Zeider in the eighth inning was one of the best ever observed in a World Series game. He came in running full tilt on a hard-hit ball and plucked it with his own momentum, causing him to complete a full somersault, but still came up with the ball, a smile and a wrenched neck which caused him to have to retire from the game with Babe Ruth coming in to take his place.

Freddie Thomas knocked down a hard-hit ball from Freddie Merkle behind third base in the 7th inning, the ball coming at him with such force that it drove him into foul territory, but he held up, throwing off balance, and getting Merkle at first, with the assistance of a good stretch by Stuffy McInnis. In the ninth inning Thomas went out to the Cubs' bullpen and caught Max Flack's foul fly with his back toward the plate.

Carl Mays held the Cubs to three hits and they put together two of those in the 4th inning when they produced their only run. They hit Mays, but not safely after the 4th. The Red Sox had only five hits off Tyler, but it was a pair of walks a sacrifice, and an error that developed the runs.

Spitballer Claude Hendrix performed against the Sox in the 8th inning, and the site of a right-handed pitcher was a novelty to the Sox because they had seen so many left-handers in the series.

 

A peek into the statistics will reveal one big reason why the Red Sox won the series. They may just one error in six games. That happened when Whiteman dropped a fly ball in the 2nd game in Chicago, and it was not an easy chance at that, otherwise they were airtight constantly. While they did not make many runs they succeeded in having one good inning in every game that they won, and were forever keeping the ability of their opponents pinned down.

It has been a series of few runs, countless spectacular plays, and a series that veteran baseball men declare compares favorably, in excellence, with any that has yet been played. It was not a great financial success because prices were lowered and conditions were different than it was last year, but it was a fight from start to finish.

An interesting sidelight was the release of carrier pigeons at the end of each inning, with the birds taking to Camp Devens, a progress report of the game. The one that was released at the end of the 5th inning evidently did not have his mind on his work, for he started towards downtown Boston, but he figured it out, and turned completely around and headed west.

The Sox had men on in every inning except the eighth, but they tallied in the third. Carl Mays was walked and took second on Harry Hooper's sacrifice. Shean was then walked and both advanced when Amos Strunk was being tossed out by Charlie Pick. George Whiteman then slammed one to right field at Max Flack, who dropped it and both runners scored. Whitey stopped at first, but he was retired trying to go from first to third on Stuffy's single to Hollocher.

Tyler filled the bases, but worked out of a tough situation in the 4th inning. Scott singled up the middle, was sacrificed a notch by Thomas. Wally Schang walked and Mays beat out a bunt down the third base line. With the bases loaded. Freddie Merkle got Harry Hooper's ground ball and forced Scotty out at home. Charlie Deal made a great play knocking down Dave Shean's line drive behind third base and keeping his outstretched foot on the third base bag to force Mays, ending the inning.

The second, fourth, and fifth innings were the only innings in which the Cubs reached base. Charlie Pick, who singled with two gone in the second, was picked off first by Carl Mays. In the fourth, Flack drove a single to center, advanced the second when Hollocher grounded to McInnis, and then Mays hit Les Mann on the leg, allowing him to go to first. Mann was no sooner on first, than Schang picked him off. Paskert then walked and Flack scored when Merkle shot a single to left.

The last play of the game was a grounder from Mann to Dave Shean who threw over to Stuffy McInnis. Stuffy held up the ball with glee as the fleet footed Mann was running it out for all he was worth. Then Hooper, Ruth, Mays, Shean, Schang, Scott, and all the others came running out of the stillness and gathered around Mays, hugging and patting each other on the back.

The Cubs left for home at 11 o'clock last night with Bill Killifer receiving the check from the National Commission, but the money will not be split up until after a meeting in Chicago, when Pres. Weeghman's contribution will be added to the pot. The Red Sox players expect to get approximately $890 each. The members of the National Commission stayed over last night, but will leave for a home tomorrow.

Dutch Leonard says that he is in the Army now. He quit the Fore River Shipyard job two weeks ago and recently received word from his draft board that he has been in the Army since September 3rd He is awaiting his summons to report. Bill McCabe of the Cubs is due to enter the Army immediately.

Joe Lannin and Bill Carrigan saw the game sitting in the box seats. The two that had earned the 1915 and 1916 championships must have had some great memories come back to them.

Freddie Parent and George Whiteman had a reunion before the game. Both men were members of the Red Sox in 1907. Whiteman originally came to the Red Sox, along with Tris Speaker from Houston. He is now a native of Peoria, Illinois, Pres. Frazee's hometown.

Manager Ed Barrow is worthy of much praise, applying himself to the job of managing the club after being a league executive is not easy, especially when one of your players is a moody Babe Ruth. Pres. Frazee and Barrow had nothing but high praise for the team. Pres. Frazee noted that the Red Sox have never lost a World Series and the championship deserves to remain here.



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1918 WORLD SERIES

 

 

Boston Red Sox

4 Games

 

 

Chicago Cubs

2 Games

 

 
 

FENWAY PARK

 

BATTER

 

 

0
STRIKES

0
BALLS

0
OUTS

 
 
 

P

C

WORLD SERIES, GAME #6

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

 

R

H

E

 
     

CHICAGO CUBS

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

   

1

3

2

 
     

BOSTON RED SOX

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

x

   

2

5

0

 

 

W-Carl Mays (2-0)
L-Lefty Tyler (1-1)
Attendance - 15,238
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CUBS

 

AB

R

H

 

 

Max Flack rf 2 1 0  

 

Charlie Hollocher ss 3 2 3  

 

Les Mann lf 3 0 1  

 

Dode Paskert cf 3 0 1  

 

Fred Merkle 1b 3 0 1  

 

Charlie Pick 2b 4 0 1  

 

Charlie Deal 3b 4 0 0  

 

Turner Barber ph 4 0 0  

 

Rollie Zeider 3b 4 0 0  

 

Bill Killifer c 4 0 0  

 

Bob O'Farrell ph/c 4 0 0  

 

Lefty Tyler p 4 0 0  

 

Bill McCabe ph 4 0 0  

 

Claude Hendrix p 4 0 0  
             
    IP H ER SO  
  Lefty Tyler 7 5 0 1  
  Claude Hendrix 1 0 0 0  

 

 

 

             

 

RED SOX

 

AB

R

H

 

 

Harry Hooper

rf

3 0 0  

 

Dave Shean

2b

3 1 0  

 

Amos Strunk

cf

4 0 2  

 

George Whiteman

lf

4 0 0  

 

Babe Ruth

lf

0 0 0  

 

Stuffy McInnis

1b

4 0 1  

 

Everett Scott

ss

4 0 1  

 

Fred Thomas

3b

2 0 0  
 

Wally Schang

c

1 0 0  
 

Carl Mays

p

2 1 1  
             
    IP H ER SO  
  Carl Mays 9 3 1 1