1917 BOSTON RED SOX ... 
GAMBLING WITH HARRY FRAZEE ...

 

Lou Boudreau   Dom DiMaggio   Joe Dobson   Mickey Harris
Born: July 17th   Born: Feb 12th   Born: March 9th   Born: Jan 30th
Tommy Holmes   Sam Jethroe   Johnny Sain   Bill Salkeld
Born: March 29th   Born: Jan 23rd   Born: Sept 25th   Born: March 8th
Sid Gordon   Ty LaForest   Sal Maglie   Phil Rizzuto
Born: Aug 13th   Born: April 18th   Born: April 26th   Born: Sept 25th

 

By 1917 all of Europe was engulfed in "The Great War" and by the spring the United States was pulled into the conflict. Over the next year, few aspects of American society proved immune to the effects of war. As life changed forever in America, so did baseball.

Less than a month after winning the World Series, Joe Lannin decided to sell the Red Sox. In his three years as owner, he had reportedly made $400,000 while most other owners had been strapped in their battle with the Federal League. Now, with a real war on the horizon, nobody was sure what would happen next. Apart from the worry about the war, Lannin was tired of American League president, Ban Johnson's constant interference. His intrusion into the sale of Tris Speaker had been the last straw. Not even a world championship could offset Lannin's growing dismay of the politics involved in major league baseball. He realized that the rules for doing business were different for those named Connie Mack or Charles Comiskey. Lannin was a baseball fan, didn't want to play political games, and with the Red Sox at the highest value they would probably be at, he decided to sell.

 

1917 RED SOX PITCHERS

In the past, Ban Johnson had bullied his way into the sale of every franchise, by either initiating the transaction or engineering it outright. This is how Lannin had bought the Red Sox from James McAleer. Lannin was determined to leave on his own terms and for his own price. Although a handful of local investors and tried to broker a deal, including one that involved Mayor Honey Fitz's son-in-law, Joseph Kennedy, Lannin ignored the proposals and sold his club to Harry Frazee.

Frazee was a man symbolic of the age, a pure product of America, who started with nothing and built an empire. His empire was Broadway in New York City. Being an entertainment mogul, Frazee thought it would be beneficial to expand into the world of baseball. The Red Sox were the baseball's diamond crown, having won two championships, and would look good in Frazee's portfolio. Frazee's social circle included the most popular actors of the era, as well as those who were at the pinnacle of politics and finance in New York City. His social register included everyone from George M. Cohan and New York Mayor, Jimmy Walker, to Charles Lindbergh.

Back in 1909, Frazee had approached John I. Taylor about buying the Red Sox, but the deal fell through. In 1911 he had made a bid to buy the Boston Braves and made subsequent overtures for the Chicago Cubs and New York Giants. Although his initial efforts to buy his way into major league baseball had failed, he hired professional boxer James J. Corbett to appear in some of his theatrical productions. In 1915 he had made a splash when, after being rebuffed by the United States in trying to match the white boxer Jess Willard against black champion Jack Johnson, he put up the money behind their famous bout in Havana.

By 1916 his empire had expanded to include real estate management and a stock brokerage business. He was already a millionaire, successful, connected, gregarious and flamboyant. Although he loved baseball, he viewed it as just another production. To him baseball was essentially an arm of show business. To Frazee, purchasing the Red Sox was the same as investing in another Broadway show.

In October 1916, Frazee offered $675,000 for the Red Sox, which was far more than anyone else. The offer was too good for Lannin to refuse. Although Frazee was using profits from Broadway to buy the team, he was unwilling to risk the entire amount. So rather than buying the team outright, Frazee offered half the sale amount in cash and offered to pay the balance with the profits he would earn in the future. The deal included Fenway Park, which the Taylor family and the Fenway Park Realty company had finally divested themselves of. In fact, the ballpark may have been the key to landing a deal. Land in the Fens was becoming pricey. There was speculation that Frazee might sell off the land Fenway Park was on and move the team to Braves Field.

But the deal still worked for Joe Lannin. The Red Sox had always made money and the deal was structured in such a way that he would make a good profit and allowed him a percentage of the proceeds over the next few years until 1920, when Frazee had to make his final payment to Lannin. It was this deal that eventually sent the Red Sox stars to the Yankees, because Frazee was so leveraged with his Broadway investments, that he had to ask his friend Yankee owner, Jacob Ruppert to give him the money to payoff Lannin. And so Babe Ruth would be sold to Ruppert to get the money for Frazee to pay off Lannin in 1920.

When Ban Johnson found out about the deal, he hit the roof. After the war with the Federal League and a real war on the horizon, Johnson thought the last thing that baseball needed was a spendthrift like Harry Frazee to drive up the costs for everybody else. To Johnson, Frazee was the ultimate outsider. He was a young, brash New Yorker, and not someone who was under his control. Part of the reason that Lannin sold to Frazee was to stick it to Ban Johnson.

 

HARRY FRAZEE SIGNS JACK BARRY

Accustomed to running the show, Frazee took control of the team. He tried, but failed to convince Bill Carrigan to return as manager and so Jack Barry was hired to be his replacement. The Red Sox began the 1917 season with virtually the same team that had won the World Series. Frazee remained in the background, at least as far as the public new. But behind the scenes he was already rankling some feathers.

Free passes to the ballpark for local politicians and others, like the more influential members of the Royal Rooters, were long-established traditions. There were more city workers at Fenway Park for a baseball game than there were at City Hall on those days. Frazee cut back on the popular perks, thereby alienating many longtime supporters, including the Royal Rooters. He similarly estranged the press, treating them like theater critics. When anyone criticized the Red Sox in the newspaper, he made the person pay his way into the ballpark, then threatened to ban him if the coverage did not improve.

Frazee's enemies were rapidly increasing in number, and the backlash soon started. Frazee was painted as a greedy, money-grubbing carpetbagger and a con man. It was easy for the press to paint Frazee in falsehoods because they told a better story. More than 80 years, the myth surrounding Harry Frazee, especially the ones about selling off Babe Ruth, have been erroneously taken as truth.

If there was ever any doubt as to how openly gamblers were allowed to operate at major league ballparks in the early 20th century, the "Gambler's Riot" on June 16th, should have expelled it forever. In that game, with rain threatening and Babe Ruth losing, 3-0, gambler's jumped onto the field in the top of the fifth inning to cause a delay, hoping the impending rain would cause the "unofficial" game at that point, to be called off and save their bets made on the Babe to be nullified.

That this kind of business went on as usual after such a public spectacle illustrates just how little attention American League president Ban Johnson and other baseball officials paid to the gambling menace that would soon threaten to destroy the game with the Black Sox Scandal.  And it was no coincidence that the "Gamblers Riot" happened in Boston. World Series involving the Red Sox, in 1912, had been plagued by rumors of game-fixing, and heavy betting was common on the team’s games.

By the time Harry Frazee bought the Red Sox, the city was regarded as the biggest center of baseball gambling in the country. An American League investigator later reported that Frazee “entertains more gamblers in his right field pavilion every day than the rest of the majors combined.”

President Johnson, meanwhile, was livid after the Gamblers Riot. He announced to the press that gambling “had never been tolerated by our league” and it would be stamped out in Boston “regardless of cost.” He pressed Frazee to take action against the gamblers and made a special trip to Boston to investigate the matter. Frazee rightfully suspected that Johnson was more interested in going after him instead.

 

BAN JOHNSON & BABE RUTH

Despite Johnson’s rhetoric, gambling remained as pervasive as ever, particularly in Boston. The following year, Lee Magee and Hal Chase of the Cincinnati Reds were accused of throwing games to the Boston Braves. And in 1919, the Black Sox Scandal had its roots at Boston’s Hotel Buckminster, where Chicago first baseman Chick Gandil met with gambler Joseph “Sport” Sullivan” to plan the fixing of the World Series.

But in 1917, the  Red Sox nearly repeated their pennant winning effort of the previous year. They stayed in a neck and neck race with the White Sox throughout most of the season. While both teams possessed strong pitching, the Red Sox could not match the White Sox in terms of offense. Bolstered by the .300 hitting of Joe Jackson and Happy Felsch, Chicago led the American League with 656 runs while batting a respectable .253 as a team. By way of comparison, the Red Sox could only manage a .246 team average with 555 runs.

In the month of September the Red Sox only played .500 ball. After a weekend series in Chicago in late August, the Red Sox were in second place, only two games behind the league-leading White Sox. At the end Chicago won 100 games and the Red Sox only won 90, trailing the White Sox by nine games at the end of the season.

Babe Ruth, as people were beginning to expect, provided most of the year's excitement. Cementing his reputation as the best left-handed pitcher in baseball, the Babe won a career-high 24 games and lost only 13 for a robust .649 winning percentage. He also pitched six shutout while completing an astonishing 31 games.

On June 23rd he was intimately involved in one of the most amazing pitching feats ever recorded Fenway Park, and all he did was throw four pitches. In the first game of a doubleheader against Washington, Ruth walked leadoff hitter Kid Foster on four pitches. After each pitch, Ruth complained more and more vigorously to the umpire Brick Owens after every pitch. Owens warned Ruth to keep his mouth shut he's throw him out of the game. The Babe, got more and more angry and threatened to punch Owens in the mouth if he threw him out. So Owens immediately tossed him from the game and Ruth tried to make good on his promise. He reached around his catcher Pinch Thomas and got in a couple of punches before the police came out of the stands and escorted him off the field. Without warming up, Ernie Shore came in to the game. Foster was thrown out at second base and Shore retired the next 26 batters in a row, for a perfect game.

The Babe was suspended for nine games and fined $100. When he returned, his behavior was increasingly erratic, on and off the diamond. Fame and fortune created a volatile mixture for the Babe and his drinking and whoring between starts, became more and more frequent. He maintained an apartment Fenway's red light district while Mrs. Ruth stayed at the farm in Sudbury MA. Just after the end of the season, he was in the news after crashing one of his many automobiles into two trolley cars and sending the female passenger, not Mrs. Ruth, to the hospital. Babe, who seemed superhuman, was unhurt.

 

CARL MAYS

Given all the accolades that Ruth deserved on the mound, it was easy to overlook the pitching performance of his teammate Carl Mays. Mays broke out after two years of average pitching with a superb record of 22-9. In 289 innings pitched, he allowed just 230 hits while fanning 91. Mays had a negative personality, found fault with teammates, and seem to alienate everyone, but he had grit on the mound and gave no quarter to the batters he faced. He liked to pitch high and tight and eventually got a deserved reputation as a headhunter.

While the 1917 season proceeded oblivious to world events, after the World Series it became obvious the sport would not be unaffected by the war. The American military mobilized, and by the end of October, American troops were in the trenches of France. The Selective Service Act had been passed in April and now threatened major league rosters. Scores of players either join the reserves, got married, had children, or made the acquaintance of friendly doctors to avoid the draft. Meanwhile, the 18th amendment, prohibiting the sale of alcohol had passed the Senate in August and soon became law.

 

 
GAME LOG
  RECORD PLACE GB/GF OPPONENT   SCORE  PITCHER W/L
04/11/1917 1-0 1st -  at New York Yankees W 10-3 Babe Ruth 1-0
04/12/1917 2-0 1st -  at New York Yankees W 6-1 Dutch Leonard 1-0
04/13/1917 2-0 1st -  
04/14/1917 2-1 1st -  at New York Yankees L 7-2 Herb Pennock 0-1
04/15/1917 2-1 3rd -1/2  
04/16/1917 3-1 2nd -1/2  at Philadelphia Athletics W 6-1 Babe Ruth 2-0
04/17/1917 4-1 2nd -1/2  at Philadelphia Athletics W 3-1 Ernie Shore 1-0
04/18/1917 5-1 1st -  at Philadelphia Athletics W 2-0 Dutch Leonard 2-0
04/19/1917 5-2 1st -  at Philadelphia Athletics L 4-3 Herb Pennock 0-2
04/20/1917 5-2 2nd -1/2  New York Yankees pp  
04/21/1917 6-2 2nd -1/2  New York Yankees W 6-4 Babe Ruth 3-0
04/22/1917 6-2 2nd -1  
04/23/1917 6-3 2nd -1 1/2  New York Yankees L 9-6 Rube Foster 0-1
04/24/1917 6-4 3rd -2 1/2  New York Yankees L 2-1 Dutch Leonard 2-1
04/25/1917 7-4 2nd -1 1/2  Washington Nationals W 5-4 Babe Ruth 4-0
04/26/1917 7-4 2nd -1  Washington Nationals pp  
04/27/1917 7-4 2nd -1/2  Washington Nationals pp  
04/28/1917 8-4 2nd -1/2  Washington Nationals W 7-1 Ernie Shore 2-0
04/29/1917 8-4 1st -  
04/30/1917 9-4 1st +1/2  Philadelphia Athletics W 6-3 Babe Ruth 5-0
05/01/1917 9-4 1st +1/2  Philadelphia Athletics pp  
05/02/1917 9-4 1st -  Philadelphia Athletics pp  
05/03/1917 10-4 1st +1  Philadelphia Athletics W 2-0 Dutch Leonard 3-1
05/04/1917 10-4 1st +1  at Washington Nationals pp  
05/05/1917 10-4 1st +1 1/2  at Washington Nationals pp  
05/06/1917 10-4 1st +1 1/2  
05/07/1917 11-4 1st +2  at Washington Nationals W 2-0 Babe Ruth 6-0
05/08/1917 11-4 1st +2  at Washington Nationals pp  
 at Washington Nationals pp  
05/09/1917 12-4 1st +2  at Washington Nationals W 4-1 Ernie Shore 3-0
12-5 1st +1 1/2 L 4-3 Carl Mays 0-1
05/10/1917 13-5 1st +2  at Detroit Tigers W 3-1 Dutch Leonard 4-1
05/11/1917 14-5 1st +2  at Detroit Tigers W 2-1 Babe Ruth 7-0
05/12/1917 15-5 1st +3  at Detroit Tigers W 8-0 Carl Mays 1-1
05/13/1917 15-6 1st +2 1/2  at Detroit Tigers L 8-0 Ernie Shore 3-1
05/14/1917 15-7 1st +1 1/2  at Cleveland Indians L 7-6 Dutch Leonard 4-2
05/15/1917 16-7 1st +1 1/2  at Cleveland Indians W 6-5 Babe Ruth 8-0
05/16/1917 17-7 1st +1 1/2  at Cleveland Indians W 5-1 Carl Mays 2-1
05/17/1917 17-8 1st +1/2  at Cleveland Indians L 7-1 Ernie Shore 3-2
05/18/1917 17-9 2nd -1/2  at Chicago White Sox L 8-2 Babe Ruth 8-1
05/19/1917 17-10 3rd -1 1/2  at Chicago White Sox L 8-2 Dutch Leonard 4-3
05/20/1917 18-10 2nd -1/2  at Chicago White Sox W 2-1 Carl Mays 3-1
05/21/1917 18-10 2nd -1/2  at Chicago White Sox pp  
05/22/1917 18-10 2nd -1/2  at Chicago White Sox pp  
05/23/1917 19-10 2nd -1/2  at St. Louis Browns W 8-2 Ernie Shore 4-2
05/24/1917 20-10 2nd -1/2  at St. Louis Browns W 4-3 Babe Ruth 9-1
05/25/1917 21-10 2nd -1/2  at St. Louis Browns W 3-0 Dutch Leonard 5-3
05/26/1917 22-10 1st -  at St. Louis Browns W 11-7 King Bader 1-0
05/27/1917 22-10 2nd -1/2  at St. Louis Browns T 1-1  
05/28/1917 22-10 2nd -1/2  
05/29/1917 23-10 1st -1/2  at Washington Nationals W 2-1 Dutch Leonard 6-3
24-10 1st - W 9-0 Babe Ruth 10-1
05/30/1917 25-10 1st +1/2  at Washington Nationals W 3-2 King Bader 2-0
26-10 1st +1 W 4-3 Ernie Shore 5-2
05/31/1917 27-10 1st +1 1/2  Cleveland Indians W 5-1 Carl Mays 4-1
06/01/1917 27-11 1st +1  Cleveland Indians L 3-0 Babe Ruth 10-2
06/02/1917 27-12 1st -  Cleveland Indians L 5-0 Dutch Leonard 6-4
06/03/1917 27-12 1st -  
06/04/1917 28-12 1st -  Cleveland Indians W 2-1 Ernie Shore 6-2
06/05/1917 29-12 1st -  Cleveland Indians W 11-4 Carl Mays 5-1
06/06/1917 29-13 1st -  Detroit Tigers L 3-0 Babe Ruth 10-3
06/07/1917 29-13 1st +1/2  Detroit Tigers pp  
06/08/1917 29-14 2nd -1/2  Detroit Tigers L 7-4 Dutch Leonard 6-5
06/09/1917 29-15 2nd -1 1/2  Detroit Tigers L 1-0 Ernie Shore 6-3
06/10/1917 29-15 2nd -2  
06/11/1917 29-15 2nd -2  St. Louis Browns pp  
06/12/1917 29-15 2nd -1 1/2  St. Louis Browns pp  
06/13/1917 30-15 2nd -1 1/2  St. Louis Browns W 2-0 Babe Ruth 11-3
30-16 2nd -1 L 7-2 Carl Mays 5-2
06/14/1917 30-17 2nd -1 1/2  St. Louis Browns L 3-0 Dutch Leonard 6-6
06/15/1917 30-18 2nd -2 1/2  Chicago White Sox L 8-0 Ernie Shore 6-4
06/16/1917 30-19 2nd -3 1/2  Chicago White Sox L 7-2 Babe Ruth 11-4
06/17/1917 30-19 2nd -3 1/2  
06/18/1917 31-19 2nd -2 1/2  Chicago White Sox W 6-4 Carl Mays 6-2
32-19 2nd -1 1/2 W 8-7 Herb Pennock 1-2
06/19/1917 32-19 2nd -1 1/2  
06/20/1917 32-20 2nd -2 1/2  at New York Yankees L 3-2 Dutch Leonard 6-7
33-20 2nd -2 W 2-0 Babe Ruth 12-4
06/21/1917 33-21 2nd -2  at New York Yankees L 5-4 Herb Pennock 1-3
06/22/1917 34-21 2nd -2  at New York Yankees W 2-1 Carl Mays 7-2
06/23/1917 35-21 2nd -2  Washington Nationals W 4-0 Ernie Shore
(perfect game)
7-4
36-21 2nd -1 1/2 W 5-0 Dutch Leonard 7-7
06/24/1917 36-21 2nd -2  
06/25/1917 36-22 2nd -2 1/2  Washington Nationals L 4-0 Rube Foster 0-2
37-22 2nd -2 W 4-3 Herb Pennock 2-3
06/26/1917 37-23 2nd -2 1/2  Washington Nationals L 3-2 Carl Mays 7-3
06/27/1917 37-24 2nd -4  Washington Nationals L 7-6 Ernie Shore 7-5
06/28/1917 38-24 2nd -3  New York Yankees W 3-2 Dutch Leonard 8-7
39-24 2nd -2 1/2 W 5-0 Herb Pennock 3-3
06/29/1917 40-24 2nd -2 1/2  New York Yankees W 2-1 Rube Foster 1-2
06/30/1917 41-24 2nd -1 1/2  New York Yankees W 9-2 Carl Mays 8-3
07/01/1917 41-24 2nd -1  
07/02/1917 41-24 2nd -1 1/2  New York Yankees T 4-4  
07/03/1917 41-25 2nd -2 1/2  Philadelphia Athletics L 3-0 Babe Ruth 12-5
42-25 2nd -2 W 6-1 Dutch Leonard 9-7
07/04/1917 43-25 2nd -2  Philadelphia Athletics W 6-3 Herb Pennock 4-3
44-25 2nd -2 W 6-2 Rube Foster 2-2
07/05/1917 45-25 2nd -1  Philadelphia Athletics W 4-3 Carl Mays 9-3
46-25 2nd -1/2 W 4-2 Ernie Shore 8-5
07/06/1917 46-25 1st -  at Buffalo Bisons W 9-7  
07/07/1917 46-26 1st -  at Cleveland Indians L 3-1 Babe Ruth 12-6
07/08/1917 46-27 2nd -1  at Cleveland Indians L 1-0 Dutch Leonard 9-8
07/09/1917 46-28 2nd -1  at Cleveland Indians L 4-3 Carl Mays 9-4
07/10/1917 46-28 2nd -1/2  at Cleveland Indians pp  
07/11/1917 47-28 1st -  at Detroit Tigers W 1-0 Babe Ruth 13-6
07/12/1917 47-29 2nd -1 1/2  at Detroit Tigers L 5-0 Ernie Shore 8-6
07/13/1917 47-30 2nd -1 1/2  at Detroit Tigers L 1-0 Dutch Leonard 9-9
07/14/1917 48-30 2nd -1 1/2  at Detroit Tigers W 4-1 Carl Mays 10-4
07/15/1917 49-30 2nd -1/2  at St. Louis Browns W 4-2 Babe Ruth 14-6
50-30 1st - W 6-3 Herb Pennock 5-3
07/16/1917 50-31 2nd -1/2  at St. Louis Browns L 2-0 Rube Foster 2-3
07/17/1917 50-32 2nd -2  at St. Louis Browns L 3-2 Dutch Leonard 9-10
07/18/1917 51-32 2nd -2 1/2  at St. Louis Browns W 1-0 Carl Mays 11-4
07/19/1917 52-32 2nd -1 1/2  at Chicago White Sox W 3-2 Babe Ruth 15-6
07/20/1917 52-33 2nd -2 1/2  at Chicago White Sox L 5-2 Rube Foster 2-4
07/21/1917 52-33 2nd -2 1/2  at Chicago White Sox T 5-5  
07/22/1917 52-34 2nd -3 1/2  at Chicago White Sox L 2-0 Carl Mays 11-5
07/23/1917 52-35 2nd -4 1/2  at Chicago White Sox L 5-3 Ernie Shore 8-7
07/24/1917 52-35 2nd -4 1/2  
07/25/1917 53-35 2nd -5  St. Louis Browns W 5-4 Dutch Leonard 10-10
07/26/1917 54-35 2nd -4  St. Louis Browns W 11-2 Babe Ruth 16-6
55-35 2nd -3 1/2 W 8-3 Rube Foster 3-4
07/27/1917 55-35 2nd -4  St. Louis Browns pp  
07/28/1917 56-35 2nd -3  St. Louis Browns W 3-2 Carl Mays 12-5
57-35 2nd -2 W 3-2 Ernie Shore 9-7
07/29/1917 57-35 2nd -2  
07/30/1917 58-35 2nd -1  Chicago White Sox W 3-1 Babe Ruth 17-6
07/31/1917 59-35 1st -  Chicago White Sox W 5-2 Dutch Leonard 11-10
08/01/1917 59-36 2nd -1  Chicago White Sox L 4-0 Carl Mays 12-6
08/02/1917 59-37 2nd -2  Chicago White Sox L 7-1 Ernie Shore 9-8
08/03/1917 59-38 2nd -3  Cleveland Indians L 2-1 Babe Ruth 17-7
08/04/1917 60-38 2nd -3  Cleveland Indians W 3-2 Dutch Leonard 12-10
08/05/1917 60-38 2nd -3 1/2  
08/06/1917 60-39 2nd -3 1/2  Cleveland Indians L 2-0 Rube Foster 3-5
08/07/1917 61-39 2nd -2 1/2  Cleveland Indians W 8-6 Ernie Shore 10-8
08/08/1917 61-40 2nd -2 1/2  Detroit Tigers L 6-2 Dutch Leonard 12-11
08/09/1917 61-40 2nd -3  Detroit Tigers pp  
08/10/1917 62-40 2nd -2  Detroit Tigers W 5-4 Babe Ruth 18-7
63-40 2nd -1 1/2 W 5-1 Rube Foster 4-5
08/11/1917 64-40 2nd -1  Detroit Tigers W 7-2 Carl Mays 13-6
64-41 2nd -1 L 5-0 Ernie Shore 10-9
08/12/1917 64-41 2nd -1 1/2  
08/13/1917 65-41 2nd -1  at Philadelphia Athletics W 5-1 Dutch Leonard 13-11
08/14/1917 65-42 2nd -1  at Philadelphia Athletics L 3-1 Babe Ruth 18-8
08/15/1917 66-42 2nd -1 1/2  at Philadelphia Athletics W 4-2 Rube Foster 5-5
08/16/1917 66-42 2nd -1 1/2  
08/17/1917 67-42 2nd -1/2  at Cleveland Indians W 3-1 Carl Mays 14-6
08/18/1917 68-42 2nd -1/2  at Cleveland Indians W 9-1 Babe Ruth 19-8
68-43 2nd -1 L 2-1 Dutch Leonard 13-12
08/19/1917 68-44 2nd -2  at Cleveland Indians L 7-2 Sam Jones 0-1
08/20/1917 68-45 2nd -3  at Chicago White Sox L 7-0 Rube Foster 5-6
69-45 2nd -2 W 3-1 Carl Mays 15-6
08/21/1917 69-46 2nd -3  at Chicago White Sox L 2-0 Babe Ruth 19-9
08/22/1917 70-46 2nd -2  at Chicago White Sox W 5-1 Dutch Leonard 14-12
08/23/1917 71-46 2nd -2  at St. Louis Browns W 4-2 Carl Mays 16-6
08/24/1917 71-46 2nd -2  
08/25/1917 72-46 2nd -2  at St. Louis Browns W 3-2 Rube Foster 6-6
08/26/1917 73-46 2nd -2  at Detroit Tigers W 6-3 Carl Mays 17-6
08/27/1917 73-47 2nd -3  at Detroit Tigers L 5-1 Babe Ruth 19-10
08/28/1917 73-47 2nd -3 1/2  at Detroit Tigers pp  
08/29/1917 73-47 2nd -4 1/2  
08/30/1917 73-47 2nd -5  Philadelphia Athletics T 1-1  
08/31/1917 74-47 2nd -5  Philadelphia Athletics W 6-3 Babe Ruth 20-10
75-47 2nd -4 1/2 W 6-2 Carl Mays 18-6
09/01/1917 76-47 2nd -3 1/2  Philadelphia Athletics W 6-1 Ernie Shore 11-9
09/02/1917 76-47 2nd -4 1/2  
09/03/1917 76-48 2nd -5 1/2  New York Yankees L 1-0 Rube Foster 6-7
76-49 2nd -6 1/2 L 4-1 Dutch Leonard 14-13
09/04/1917 77-49 2nd -7 1/2  New York Yankees W 4-2 Babe Ruth 21-10
77-50 2nd -7 L 7-3 Carl Mays 18-7
09/05/1917 78-50 2nd -7  at Philadelphia Athletics W 2-1 Dutch Leonard 15-13
09/06/1917 79-50 2nd -6 1/2  at Philadelphia Athletics W 3-1 Ernie Shore 12-9
09/07/1917 80-50 2nd -6  at Philadelphia Athletics W 5-0 Rube Foster 7-7
09/08/1917 80-50 2nd -6 1/2  at Philadelphia Athletics pp  
09/09/1917 80-50 2nd -7  
09/10/1917 80-51 2nd -7 1/2  at Washington Nationals L 2-1 Babe Ruth 21-11
81-51 2nd -7 W 4-3 Carl Mays 19-7
09/11/1917 81-52 2nd -7 1/2  at Washington Nationals L 4-3 Dutch Leonard 15-14
09/12/1917 81-52 2nd -7 1/2  at Washington Nationals T 1-1  
09/13/1917 81-53 2nd -8  at New York Yankees L 13-7 Herb Pennock 5-4
09/14/1917 82-53 2nd -8  at New York Yankees W 6-5 Carl Mays 20-7
09/15/1917 83-53 2nd -7 1/2  at New York Yankees W 8-3 Babe Ruth 22-11
09/16/1917 83-53 2nd -7 1/2  at Jersey City T 4-4  
09/17/1917 84-53 2nd -7 1/2  at New York Yankees W 6-1 Dutch Leonard 16-14
09/18/1917 84-53 2nd -8  at Detroit Tigers pp  
09/19/1917 84-54 2nd -8  at Detroit Tigers L 5-2 Ernie Shore 12-10
84-55 2nd -8 1/2 L 1-0 Carl Mays 20-8
09/20/1917 84-56 2nd -9 1/2  at Detroit Tigers L 1-0 Babe Ruth 22-12
09/21/1917 84-57 2nd -10 1/2  Chicago White Sox L 2-1 Dutch Leonard 16-15
09/22/1917 85-57 2nd -9 1/2  Chicago White Sox W 4-1 Carl Mays 21-8
09/23/1917 85-57 2nd -9 1/2  
09/24/1917 86-57 2nd -8 1/2  Chicago White Sox W 3-0 Babe Ruth 23-12
09/25/1917 87-57 2nd -8 1/2  Cleveland Indians W 4-3 Ernie Shore 13-10
09/26/1917 87-58 2nd -8 1/2  Cleveland Indians L 2-0 Dutch Leonard 16-16
09/27/1917 87-58 2nd -9  Major League Stars W 2-0  
09/28/1917 87-59 2nd -9 1/2  St. Louis Browns L 2-1 Carl Mays 21-9
09/29/1917 88-59 2nd -9 1/2  St. Louis Browns W 13-5 Rube Foster 8-7
89-59 2nd -8 1/2 W 11-0 Babe Ruth 24-12
09/30/1917 89-59 2nd -8 1/2  
10/01/1917 89-59 2nd -8  
10/02/1917 89-60 2nd -8 1/2  Washington Nationals L 9-7 Dutch Leonard 16-17
90-60 2nd -8 W 2-1 Carl Mays 22-9
10/03/1917 90-61 2nd -8 1/2  Washington Nationals L 6-0 Babe Ruth 24-13
10/04/1917 90-62 2nd -9  Washington Nationals L 5-4 Herb Pennock 5-5
 
1917 RED SOX BATTING & PITCHING
 
 

 

 

FINAL 1917 STANDINGS

 

 

Chicago White Sox 100 54 -

 

 

BOSTON RED SOX

90 62 9

 

 

Cleveland Indians 88 66 12

 

 

Detroit Tigers 78 75 21 1/2

 

 

Washington Nationals 74 79 25 1/2

 

 

New York Yankees 71 82 28 1/2

 

 

St. Louis Browns 57 97 43

 

 

Philadelphia Athletics 55 98 44 1/2

 

 

 
1916 RED SOX 1918 RED SOX