1914 BOSTON RED SOX ...
"THE BABE" ARRIVES IN BOSTON...

 

Harry Brecheen   Joe DiMaggio   Ellis Kinder   Dick O'Connell
Born: Oct 14th   Born: Nov 25th   Born: July 26th   Born: Sept 19th


In 1914, a minor-league named the Midwestern Federal League announced that it would become a third major league to compete with the National League and the American League, much as the American League had done 13 years earlier. The Feds began to raid major league teams, driving up salaries dramatically. American League President Ban Johnson felt that Red Sox owner James McAleer did not have enough money to compete with the Federal League. Accompanied with the fact that Red Sox attendance was down in 1913, led Johnson to look to replace McAleer.

Without McAleer's knowledge, Johnson chose Joseph Lannin to replace him as president of the Red Sox. Lannin was a real estate owner, a competitive athlete, and had a minority interest in the Boston Braves. He was very knowledgeable about the game, wanted to own a major league club outright and therefore was investigating the purchase of the Philadelphia Phillies. The two met and Johnson then organized the overthrow of McAleer. Lannin divested himself of any connection with the Braves, and with the help of Johnson, paid $200,000 for the controlling shares of the Red Sox.

 

JOE LANNIN

After the deal was completed, the Red Sox ownership had now changed hands for the fifth time in 13 seasons. The first thing Lannin did was turn complete full control of baseball operations to Bill Carrigan. Carrigan reviewed all the player contracts and even chose new team uniforms. So when spring training opened in 1914, Carrigan was ready and in charge.

Carrigan reduced the exhibition game schedule to only 12 games and conducted one long daily workout from 10 AM to 3 PM, as opposed to the two-a-days that had been scheduled in previous years. He eliminated the mountain hikes and required the players to run or walk the 2 miles from the hotel to the ball field at Hot Springs.

On March 6, 1914 Lannin decided to meet Tris Speaker in New York and re-sign him before the Federal League had a chance to talk with him. The stakes were in enormous and he knew Speaker would command baseball's most lucrative salary. Losing Speaker would cost the team both on the field and the gate receipts. Along with former Red Sox owner, and now vice-president and minority owner, John I. Taylor, the man who signed Speaker to his first contract, the two met him as he came off the Lusitania, returning from a vacation. Speaker immediately figured out what was going on, and told the pair that he intended to listen to the representatives of the Federal League before signing any contract.

At the Knickerbocker Hotel, the Federal League representatives placed a $15,000 cash signing bonus on the table and offered him a three year contract for another $15,000 per year. Speaker mulled over the offer and decided that he wanted to stay in Boston and not take a chance on jumping to the unknown. He met Lanin and Taylor for dinner and signed a two-year, $36,000 contract, and becoming the highest paid player in baseball.

 

TRIS SPEAKER

The Federal League executives were devastated. The big name players would not jump to their league. They had approached Ty Cobb and Walter Johnson without a positive result, and now they couldn't get Tris Speaker.  But still they caused the salaries of the major league to go up dramatically across the board.  Lannin could afford it and Ban Johnson was happy with the change in Boston.

Interest in the 1914 baseball season was very high in Boston and when tickets first went on sale, there was a rush to buy them up. The big question at spring training was whether Joe Wood could return to his form and had recovered from his injuries of the year before. After the disappointment of 1913, Carrigan brought more players into camp than had ever been done before.

The Red Sox started the season slowly, losing to Walter Johnson on opening day. Then Carrigan's young pitching staff began to come around. Although sophomore Dutch Leonard lost twice in April, both defeats were by the score of 1 to 0. Rookie pitcher Rankin Johnson had an impressive major league start by beating Walter Johnson on April 24th in Washington.  Along with veteran Ray Collins, Rube Foster and Hugh Bedient, the Sox pitching seemed to be in fine shape.

Rookie shortstop Everett Scott anchored the Boston infield and was a steady performer, who ultimately would be considered one of the best shortstops in Red Sox history. He set the consecutive games played record that stood up until Lou Gehrig broke it.  The outfield was still the best in baseball, with Duffy Lewis, Harry Hooper and Tris Speaker.

Red Sox fans warmed up to the 1914 edition.  In the middle of May, Joe Wood made his first appearance of the year in relief of Hugh Bedient in a 9 to 3 Red Sox loss. The crowd started cheering from the bleachers and the cheers moved all the way to the grandstand when Wood took the mound. He didn't disappoint and rewarded the crowd by striking out the first hitter he faced and pitched a scoreless inning.

On May 8th, Dutch Leonard pitched high-class ball in a sharp tight contest with the Yankees. Dutch had allowed New York only two hits, both of whom were thrown out by Bill Carrigan while trying for second base and not one Yankee baserunner reached second. Although the Yankees threatened in the ninth, there were 11 strikeouts for Dutch in the game. He fanned at least one man in each inning, showing how strong he was with his control. He disposed of five men on strikes in the last three innings.

On May 22nd, the Sox beat a good White Sox team, by a score of 1 to 0. It was a pitcher's battle between Eddie Cicotte, the knuckleball artist, and Rube Foster. Foster got the credit for the victory, his fourth straight shutout and 37 innings in succession, without a run being scored against him.

On May 29th, in a doubleheader at Fenway Park with Washington, it was a battle of the Johnsons in the first game, that Walter Johnson managed to pull out with a 1-0 victory over Rankin Johnson.

The second game was quite different, as first one team took the lead and the other battling back, with the Red Sox coming all the way for a winning finish in the 10th inning, by a score of 6 to 5. In the top of the 10th, Washington scored a run and in the bottom of the inning both Bill Carrigan and pinch hitter Clyde Engle drew walks. Then with two outs, Everett Scott smashed a single to left that scored Olaf Henriksen, running for Carrigan, and the score was tied. Duffy Lewis next hit a slow ground ball to shortstop, George McBride, who threw quickly to first base. But Chick Gandil pulled his foot off the bag, allowing Engle to come in with the winning run.

In another battle between Walter Johnson and Rankin Johnson on June 1st, meeting for the third time this season, saw Rankin winning, making it two out of three against his illustrious namesake. The score was 1 to 0, and it indeed was a fight from start to finish. Only five hits were made off each man, and an error which was mixed in with the two hits made by the Red Sox, in the fifth inning, was a factor in the scoring of the only run made in the game.

Hick Cady singled past first base. Rankin attempted to bunt, but Walter fielded the ball cleanly and tried to force Cady at second base. Unfortunately for Walter, he hit Cady in the back with his throw. Harry Hooper then singled him in with the winning run.

By the beginning of June, the Philadelphia Athletics started to run away with the American League. The Red Sox were playing no better than .500 baseball and quickly fell into the middle of the pack, behind by five games. The pitching was impressive. Rube Foster had pitched four consecutive shutouts and Dutch Leonard and Ray Collins were having very good years.

 

JACK DUNN SIGNS BABE RUTH

The Federal League was making it difficult for cities like St. Louis, Chicago and Brooklyn that had to field multiple teams. In Baltimore, the Federal League Baltimore Terrapins made life difficult for the International League team, the Baltimore Orioles. Orioles owner, Jack Dunn was bleeding money, even though his team was in first place. He had tried unsuccessfully to move his franchise out of Baltimore, and then was faced with the reality of having a sell his prize players, in order to keep from going out of business. Over a three-day period he sold off the guts of his ball club.

Joseph Lannin and Bill Carrigan, realizing that they were not going to compete with the Philadelphia Athletics and decided to build for 1915. Lannin traveled to Baltimore to meet with Dunn and he returned with three players. He had purchased pitchers Babe Ruth, Ernie Shore and catcher Ben Egan for $22,500.

Babe Ruth arrived in Boston on Saturday, July 11th. That morning he would meet his future bride, Helen Woodward, who served him bacon and eggs in a coffee shop, and that afternoon, less than five months after leaving St. Mary’s,  he pitched his first major league game for the Red Sox against the last-place Cleveland Naps. The Babe won his major league debut by a score of 4 to 3. He held Cleveland to five hits in six innings, with one strikeout, but was hit hard and left the game in the seventh inning. In comparison to Dutch Leonard, who took over for him and pitched the last two innings, getting everyone out in order and striking out four, Babe looked like nothing more than a kid with undisciplined talent.

Carrigan realized that Babe Ruth was a good prospect in 1914. He looked like a promising pitcher, but would make bad pitching decisions. His raw talent was not enough against major league hitters.  He served up fat pitches to good hitters or made bad pitches in key situations, as well as making bad plays in the field. Carrigan used Ruth carefully as the summer progressed.

 

BABE RUTH

The Babe wasted little time in adapting to Boston. He soon discovered the red light district near Fenway Park and made friends with gamblers and members of the Royal Rooters. These people took advantage of him, to the point where he was broke all the time. The Red Sox management eventually put him on allowance, and made Bill Carrigan his roommate.

As Harry Hooper later described him: Babe Ruth was a 19-year-old kid, poorly educated, ill-mannered and crude, but was a good pitcher with a lot of potential. He had never been anywhere and knew nothing about life. In the years to come, as Hooper saw him grow into a man, the idol of American kids and something pretty close to a god, who transformed baseball forever, Hooper could only shake his head in amazement.

But in 1914, Babe was a brash young 19 year old prospect and rubbed veteran players the wrong way. He was full of self-confidence and refused to be treated like a rookie. He demanded to take batting practice, something unheard of by a pitcher, never mind a rookie pitcher. A practicing Catholic, on an already segregated team, Babe soon came into conflict with Joe Wood and Tris Speaker, the outspoken Protestants. Whether it was because he was Catholic or just a loud mouth, he had ongoing ruin-ins with the two star players, not to mention other teammates in general.

Babe was eventually sent down to the Providence team for the remainder of the season, where he helped the Providence Grays capture the International League pennant, but he came back to pitch against the Yankees on October 2nd, and held them to six hits for his second and final win of the season, 4 to 3. It was a game that also saw him collect his first major league hit, a double off Leonard Cole.

 

DUTCH LEONARD

The Red Sox surged in July, and by the first of August, the Red Sox were 55-41, but still seven games behind Philadelphia. Dutch Leonard was the ace of the staff with a 16-3 record and Joe Wood was 6-1.

On July 13th, Ray Collins held Cleveland runless and almost hitless, in a game which the Red Sox won 2 to 0. Collins never pitched better and from start to finish there was a snap to the work of the big southpaw which made it appear that he enjoyed every minute of his task. The further he went the better he seemed to be getting. Only two hits were made off him, and the Naps were sent back to the bench as fast as they came up. Only four of Cleveland batters were able to reach first base.

The rookie Ernie Shore looked like a seasoned veteran. He started off by winning his first game on July 14th and then his next three starts to begin his career with a 4-0 record.

On July 20th, Dutch Leonard pitched eight innings of no-hit ball in relief against the Tigers at Fenway. Tris Speaker won the game in the 16th inning with a walk-off hit.

The Red Sox finished the season with a record of 91-62, some 8 1/2 games behind Philadelphia. Even though they were out of it, on September 5th, the Sox took some pride back when they swept a four game series with the Athletics. The Sox put up one of their best games of the season. Ernie Shore was two much for Philly in that game and received great support by his infielders.

In an historic post script, on October 2nd, in a game against the Yankees, Babe Ruth pitched an excellent game. And in the seventh inning, Babe launched his first major league hit, a stinging doubled to right.

The young pitching staff was being constructed as the foundation that would become one of the best in the history of baseball. At the end, Ray Collins won 20 games, Rube Foster won 14, Ernie Shore won 10, and Joe Wood won 10. Dutch Leonard ended up winning 19 games in 1914, with a .096 ERA, the lowest ever recorded by a starting pitcher in baseball history.

But in Boston, the "Miracle" Braves overshadowed the Red Sox by winning 52 of 66 games from July to September, coming from last-place to first place and overtaking the New York Giants to become the champions of the National League. The Braves became the darlings of Boston in 1914, and Bill Carrigan returned to Maine after the season, determined to not let the Red Sox become also-rans in 1915.

But 1914 would be best remembered for what happened off the playing field. In August, Europe exploded into war. While the United States stood separated from the conflict by the Atlantic Ocean, the fears that America would stay isolated from the battlefield would soon be realized in the upcoming years. In the next few years, baseball would become a way for Americans to not think about what was happening overseas.

 
 
GAME LOG
  RECORD PLACE GB/GF OPPONENT   SCORE  PITCHER W/L
04/14/1914 0-1 5th -1  Washington Nationals L 3-0 Ray Collins 0-1
04/16/1914 1-1 4th -1 1/2  Washington Nationals pp  
04/15/1914 1-1 4th -1  Washington Nationals W 2-1 Rube Foster 1-0
04/17/1914 1-2 5th -2 1/2  Washington Nationals L 1-0 Dutch Leonard 0-1
04/18/1914 2-2 4th -2 1/2  Philadelphia Athletics W 1-0 Hugh Bedient 1-0
04/19/1914 2-2 6th -3  
04/20/1914 2-3 7th -3 1/2  Philadelphia Athletics L 8-2 Hugh Bedient 1-1
2-4 7th -3  Philadelphia Athletics L 6-0 Rube Foster 1-1
04/21/1914 2-4 7th -3 1/2  Philadelphia Athletics T 1-1  
04/22/1914 2-4 7th -4  Philadelphia Athletics T 9-9  
04/23/1914 3-4 5th -3  at Washington Nationals W 5-0 Rankin Johnson 1-0
04/24/1914 4-4 4th -2 1/2  at Washington Nationals W 5-3 Ray Collins 1-1
04/25/1914 4-4 4th -2  at Washington Nationals pp  
04/26/1914 4-4 4th -1 1/2  
04/27/1914 4-5 6th -2  at Washington Nationals L 6-1 Rube Foster 1-2
04/28/1914 4-5 7th -2 1/2  at New York Yankees pp  
04/29/1914 4-6 7th -3 1/2  at New York Yankees L 1-0 Dutch Leonard 0-2
04/30/1914 4-6 7th -4  at New York Yankees pp  
05/01/1914 4-7 7th -5  at New York Yankees L 6-0 Hugh Bedient 1-2
05/02/1914 4-8 7th -5  at Philadelphia Athletics L 5-2 Rankin Johnson 1-1
05/03/1914 4-8 7th -5 1/2  
05/04/1914 5-8 7th -6  at Philadelphia Athletics W 9-1 Dutch Leonard 1-2
05/05/1914 5-8 7th -6  at Philadelphia Athletics pp  
05/06/1914 5-9 7th -6  at Philadelphia Athletics L 7-3 Ray Collins 1-2
05/07/1914 6-9 7th -5 1/2  New York Yankees W 2-0 Rube Foster 2-2
05/08/1914 7-9 6th -5 1/2  New York Yankees W 3-0 Dutch Leonard 2-2
05/09/1914 7-10 6th -6 1/2  New York Yankees L 3-2 Ray Collins 1-3
05/10/1914 7-10 6th -6  
05/11/1914 7-11 7th -6 1/2  New York Yankees L 6-2 Frtiz Coumbe 0-1
05/12/1914 8-11 6th -6 1/2  St. Louis Browns W 7-0 Rube Foster 3-2
05/13/1914 8-11 6th -6 1/2  St. Louis Browns pp  
05/14/1914 9-11 6th -6 1/2  St. Louis Browns W 1-0 Dutch Leonard 3-2
05/15/1914 9-12 6th -7 1/2  St. Louis Browns L 9-3 Hugh Bedient 1-3
05/16/1914 10-12 6th -6 1/2  Detroit Tigers W 3-0 Ray Collins 2-3
05/17/1914 10-12 6th -6 1/2  
05/18/1914 11-12 5th -5 1/2  Detroit Tigers W 2-0 Rube Foster 4-2
05/19/1914 12-12 5th -4 1/2  Detroit Tigers W 6-4 Hugh Bedient 2-3
05/20/1914 12-13 5th -5 1/2  Detroit Tigers L 3-0 Ray Collins 2-4
05/21/1914 12-14 6th -6 1/2  Chicago White Sox L 5-2 Rankin Johnson 1-2
05/22/1914 13-14 5th -5 1/2  Chicago White Sox W 1-0 Rube Foster 5-2
05/23/1914 14-14 4th -4 1/2  Chicago White Sox W 6-2 Dutch Leonard 4-2
05/24/1914 14-14 4th -4 1/2  
05/25/1914 14-15 4th -4 1/2  Cleveland Naps L 3-0 Ray Collins 2-5
05/26/1914 14-16 5th -5  Cleveland Naps L 3-2 Hugh Bedient 2-4
05/27/1914 15-16 4th -5  Cleveland Naps W 5-4 Joe Wood 1-0
05/28/1914 15-17 5th -5  Cleveland Naps L 5-2 Hugh Bedient 2-5
05/29/1914 15-18 4th -5  Washington Nationals L 1-0 Rankin Johnson 1-3
16-18 4th -5 W 6-5 Ray Collins 3-5
05/30/1914 16-19 4th -5  Washington Nationals L 6-4 Dutch Leonard 4-3
17-19 4th -5 W 7-2 Hugh Bedient 3-5
05/31/1914 17-19 4th -5  
06/01/1914 18-19 5th -4 1/2  Washington Nationals W 1-0 Rankin Johnson 2-3
06/02/1914 19-19 5th -3 1/2  Philadelphia Athletics W 3-2 Dutch Leonard 5-3
19-20 5th -4 1/2 L 4-2 Rube Foster 5-3
06/03/1914 19-21 5th -5 1/2  Philadelphia Athletics L 10-1 Ray Collins 3-6
19-22 5th -6 1/2 L 7-5 Hugh Bedient 3-6
06/04/1914 19-22 5th -6 1/2  Philadelphia Athletics pp  
06/05/1914 19-22 5th -6 1/2  Rochester Hustlers T 4-4  
06/06/1914 20-22 5th -6 1/2  at Cleveland Naps W 4-3 Ray Collins 4-6
06/07/1914 21-22 5th -5 1/2  at Cleveland Naps W 2-1 Rube Foster 6-3
06/08/1914 22-22 5th -4 1/2  at Cleveland Naps W 11-8 Hugh Bedient 4-6
06/09/1914 23-22 5th -4 1/2  at Cleveland Naps W 9-6 Guy Cooper 1-0
06/10/1914 24-22 5th -4 1/2  at Detroit Tigers W 8-2 Ray Collins 5-6
06/11/1914 24-23 5th -4 1/2  at Detroit Tigers L 2-1 Rube Foster 6-4
06/12/1914 24-24 5th -5 1/2  at Detroit Tigers L 1-0 Rankin Johnson 2-4
06/13/1914 25-24 5th -5 1/2  at Detroit Tigers W 8-6 Ray Collins 6-6
06/14/1914 26-24 5th -5 1/2  at St. Louis Browns W 10-1 Dutch Leonard 6-3
06/15/1914 27-24 5th -5 1/2  at St. Louis Browns W 2-0 Joe Wood 2-0
06/16/1914 28-24 4th -5 1/2  at St. Louis Browns W 2-0 Rube Foster 7-4
06/17/1914 28-25 5th -5 1/2  at St. Louis Browns L 4-0 Rankin Johnson 2-5
06/18/1914 29-25 4th -4 1/2  at Chicago White Sox W 8-0 Dutch Leonard 7-3
06/19/1914 29-26 4th -4 1/2  at Chicago White Sox L 3-2 Ray Collins 6-7
06/20/1914 29-27 4th -5 1/2  at Chicago White Sox L 5-2 Joe Wood 2-1
06/21/1914 29-28 5th -5 1/2  at Chicago White Sox L 5-3 Rube Foster 7-5
06/22/1914 29-29 5th -6 1/2  at Chicago White Sox L 5-4 Rankin Johnson 2-6
06/23/1914 29-29 5th -6 1/2  
06/24/1914 30-29 5th -6 1/2  at New York Yankees W 3-0 Dutch Leonard 8-3
20-30 5th -5 1/2 L 3-2 Hugh Bedient 4-7
06/25/1914 30-31 5th -6  at New York Yankees L 3-2 Ray Collins 6-8
31-31 5th -5 1/2 W 4-3 Joe Wood 3-1
06/26/1914 32-31 5th -6  at New York Yankees W 2-1 Dutch Leonard 9-3
06/27/1914 33-31 5th -6  at New York Yankees W 5-3 Joe Wood 4-1
06/28/1914 33-31 5th -6  at Long Branch (Cuba) W 2-0  
06/29/1914 34-31 5th -5  at Philadelphia Athletics W 7-1 Dutch Leonard 10-3
34-32 5th -6 L 7-2 Rankin Johnson 2-7
06/30/1914 35-32 5th -5  at Philadelphia Athletics W 5-3 Ray Collins 7-8
07/01/1914 35-32 5th -5  at Philadelphia Athletics pp  
07/02/1914 36-32 3rd -4  at Philadelphia Athletics W 7-6 Dutch Leonard 11-3
37-32 3rd -3 W 7-1 Fritz Coumbe 1-1
07/03/1914 37-33 3rd -4  at Washington Nationals L 12-0 Rankin Johnson 2-8
38-33 3rd -4 W 3-1 Joe Wood 5-1
07/04/1914 39-34 3rd -3  at Washington Nationals W 1-0 Ray Collins 8-8
39-35 3rd -3 L 3-2 Hugh Bedient 4-8
07/05/1914 39-34 3rd -4  
07/06/1914 39-35 5th -5  at Washington Nationals L 1-0 Rankin Johnson 2-9
07/07/1914 39-35 5th -5  Chicago White Sox pp  
07/08/1914 39-36 6th -6  Chicago White Sox L 4-2 Hugh Bedient 4-9
39-37 6th -6 1/2 L 5-4 Fritz Coumbe 1-2
07/09/1914 39-38 6th -6  Chicago White Sox L 3-2 Ray Collins 8-9
07/10/1914 40-38 6th -5 1/2  Chicago White Sox W 5-1 Rankin Johnson 3-9
07/11/1914 41-38 6th -5  Cleveland Naps W 4-3 Babe Ruth 1-0
07/12/1914 41-38 6th -5  
07/13/1914 42-38 5th -4 1/2  Cleveland Naps W 2-0 Ray Collins 9-9
07/14/1914 43-38 5th -4  Cleveland Naps W 2-1 Ernie Shore 1-0
07/15/1914 44-38 4th -3 1/2  Cleveland Naps W 4-0 Dutch Leonard 12-3
07/16/1914 44-39 4th -4 1/2  Detroit Tigers L 5-2 Babe Ruth 1-1
07/17/1914 45-39 3rd -4  Detroit Tigers W 8-2 Ray Collins 10-9
07/18/1914 45-40 4th -5 1/2  Detroit Tigers L 4-2 Hugh Bedient 4-10
07/19/1914 45-40 4th -5 1/2  
07/20/1914 46-40 3rd -5 1/2  Detroit Tigers W 3-2 Dutch Leonard 13-3
07/21/1914 46-40 3rd -6 1/2  St. Louis Browns T 1-1  
07/22/1914 47-40 2nd -6 1/2  St. Louis Browns W 5-3 Hugh Bedient 5-10
48-40 2nd -6 W 6-2 Ernie Shore 2-0
07/23/1914 48-40 2nd -6 1/2  St. Louis Browns pp  
pp  
07/24/1914 48-40 2nd -6 1/2  
07/25/1914 49-40 2nd -6 1/2  at Cleveland Naps W 8-6 Ray Collins 11-9
07/26/1914 50-40 2nd -6 1/2  at Cleveland Naps W 4-1 Ernie Shore 3-0
07/27/1914 51-40 2nd -6 1/2  at Cleveland Naps W 3-0 Dutch Leonard 14-3
07/28/1914 51-41 2nd -6 1/2  at Cleveland Naps L 4-3 Ray Collins 11-10
07/29/1914 52-41 2nd -6 1/2  at Chicago White Sox W 8-4 Hugh Bedient 6-10
07/30/1914 53-41 2nd -6 1/2  at Chicago White Sox W 4-0 Ernie Shore 4-0
07/31/1914 54-41 2nd -6 1/2  at Chicago White Sox W 5-1 Dutch Leonard 15-3
08/01/1914 55-41 2nd -6 1/2  at Chicago White Sox W 4-2 Ray Collins 12-10
08/02/1914 55-42 2nd -7 1/2  at St. Louis Browns L 1-0 Rube Foster 7-6
08/03/1914 55-43 2nd -7 1/2  at St. Louis Browns L 6-1 Vean Gregg 0-1
08/04/1914 55-44 3rd -8 1/2  at St. Louis Browns L 2-1 Ernie Shore 4-1
08/05/1914 56-45 2nd -8 1/2  at St. Louis Browns W 6-0 Dutch Leonard 16-3
08/06/1914 56-45 2nd -8 1/2  
08/07/1914 56-45 2nd -9 1/2  at Detroit Tigers L 3-1 Vean Gregg 0-2
08/08/1914 57-45 2nd -9 1/2  at Detroit Tigers W 5-2 Joe Wood 6-1
08/09/1914 58-45 2nd -9 1/2  at Detroit Tigers W 8-6 Rube Foster 8-6
08/10/1914 58-45 2nd -10  at Detroit Tigers pp  
08/11/1914 58-45 2nd -10  
08/12/1914 58-45 2nd -10  at Lawrence Barristers W 6-4  
08/13/1914 58-46 2nd -11  New York Yankees L 1-0 Dutch Leonard 16-4
08/14/1914 58-47 2nd -11  New York Yankees L 7-6 Ray Collins 12-11
08/15/1914 59-47 2nd -11  New York Yankees W 1-0 Vean Gregg 1-2
08/16/1914 59-47 2nd -11  
08/17/1914 59-47 2nd -11  at Manchester Textiles W 4-2  
08/18/1914 59-47 2nd -10 1/2  Chicago White Sox pp  
08/19/1914 60-47 2nd -10 1/2  Chicago White Sox W 3-1 Dutch Leonard 17-4
61-47 2nd -11 W 4-1 Joe Wood 7-1
08/20/1914 62-47 2nd -11  Chicago White Sox W 3-2 Ernie Shore 5-1
08/21/1914 62-47 2nd -10 1/2  Chicago White Sox pp  
08/22/1914 63-47 2nd -10 1/2  Cleveland Naps W 4-2 Rube Foster 9-6
08/23/1914 63-47 2nd -10  
08/24/1914 64-47 2nd -11  Cleveland Naps W 7-3 Dutch Leonard 18-4
08/25/1914 64-48 2nd -12 1/2  Cleveland Naps L 3-1 Ernie Shore 5-2
08/26/1914 65-48 2nd -12 1/2  Detroit Tigers W 5-2 Vean Gregg 2-2
08/27/1914 66-48 2nd -12 1/2  Detroit Tigers W 9-2 Ray Collins 13-11
08/28/1914 66-49 2nd -12 1/2  Detroit Tigers L 3-0 Dutch Leonard 18-5
08/29/1914 66-49 2nd -13  St. Louis Browns pp  
08/30/1914 66-49 2nd -13  
08/31/1914 67-49 2nd -12  St. Louis Browns W 4-1 Dutch Leonard 19-5
67-49 2nd -12 T 3-3  
09/01/1914 68-49 2nd -12  St. Louis Browns W 7-6 Ray Collins 14-11
69-49 2nd -12 1/2 W 4-2 Ernie Shore 6-2
09/02/1914 69-50 2nd -11 1/2  St. Louis Browns L 9-6 Vean Gregg 2-3
70-50 2nd -12 1/2 W 7-3 Hugh Bedient 7-10
09/03/1914 71-50 2nd -11 1/2  Philadelphia Athletics W 3-1 Rube Foster 10-6
72-50 2nd -10 1/2 W 6-3 Joe Wood 8-1
09/04/1914 73-50 2nd -9 1/2  Philadelphia Athletics W 4-2 Ray Collins 15-11
09/05/1914 74-50 2nd -8 1/2  Philadelphia Athletics W 4-1 Ernie Shore 7-2
09/06/1914 74-50 2nd -8 1/2  
09/07/1914 75-50 2nd -7 1/2  at New York Yankees W 5-1 Rube Foster 11-6
75-51 2nd -7 L 8-1 Joe Wood 8-2
09/08/1914 76-51 2nd -8  at New York Yankees W 6-5 Ernie Shore 8-2
09/09/1914 77-51 2nd -7  at Philadelphia Athletics W 2-0 Ray Collins 16-11
09/10/1914 77-52 2nd -8  at Philadelphia Athletics L 8-1 Rube Foster 11-7
09/11/1914 77-52 2nd -8  at Philadelphia Athletics T 8-8  
09/12/1914 77-52 2nd -7 1/2  at Washington Nationals pp  
09/13/1914 77-52 2nd -7 1/2  
09/14/1914 77-53 2nd -7  at Washington Nationals L 8-1 Ernie Shore 8-3
78-53 2nd -8 W 3-0 Ray Collins 17-11
09/15/1914 79-53 2nd -8  at Washington Nationals W 2-1 Joe Wood 9-2
09/16/1914 79-53 2nd -8  
09/17/1914 80-53 2nd -8  at Cleveland Naps W 8-1 Rube Foster 12-7
09/18/1914 80-54 2nd -7  at Cleveland Naps W 4-3 Ernie Shore 9-3
09/19/1914 81-54 2nd -7  at Cleveland Naps L 5-1 Ray Collins 17-12
09/20/1914 82-54 2nd -7  at Detroit Tigers W 10-3 Vean Gregg 3-3
83-54 2nd -6 1/2 W 7-2 Joe Wood 10-2
09/21/1914 83-54 2nd -6  at Detroit Tigers T 8-8  
09/22/1914 84-54 2nd -6  at Detroit Tigers W 5-3 Ray Collins 18-12
85-54 2nd -5 1/2 W 5-0 Ray Collins 19-12
09/23/1914 85-54 2nd -5 1/2  
09/24/1914 86-54 2nd -5 1/2  at St. Louis Browns W 5-1 Rube Foster 13-7
09/25/1914 86-55 2nd -6 1/2  at St. Louis Browns L 10-1 Ernie Shore 9-4
09/26/1914 86-56 2nd -7 1/2  at St. Louis Browns L 4-1 Vean Gregg 3-4
86-57 2nd -8 L 6-4 Joe Wood 10-3
09/27/1914 87-57 2nd -8  at Chicago White Sox W 8-6 Ray Collins 20-12
87-58 2nd -8 1/2 L 4-3 Hugh Bedient 7-11
09/28/1914 88-58 2nd -7 1/2  at Chicago White Sox W 5-2 Ernie Shore 10-4
09/29/1914 88-58 2nd -7  
09/30/1914 88-58 2nd -7 1/2  
10/01/1914 88-59 2nd -8 1/2  New York Yankees L 5-3 Rube Foster 13-8
89-59 2nd -8 1/2 W 4-2 Hugh Bedient 8-11
10/02/1914 90-59 2nd -7 1/2  New York Yankees W 11-5 Babe Ruth 2-1
10/03/1914 90-60 2nd -7 1/2  New York Yankees L 3-2 Ernie Shore 10-5
10/04/1914 90-60 2nd -7 1/2  
10/05/1914 90-61 2nd -8 1/2  Washington Nationals L 9-3 Ray Collins 20-13
10/06/1914 91-61 2nd -7 1/2  Washington Nationals W 8-4 Rube Foster 14-8
10/07/1914 91-62 2nd -8 1/2  Washington Nationals L 11-4 Hugh Bedient 8-12
 
1914 RED SOX BATTING & PITCHING
 
 

 

 

FINAL 1914 STANDINGS

 

 

Philadelphia Athletics 99 53 -

 

 

BOSTON RED SOX

91 62 8 1/2

 

 

Washington Nationals 81 73 19

 

 

Detroit Tigers 80 73 19 1/2

 

 

St. Louis Browns 71 82 28 1/2

 

 

New York Yankees 70 84 30

 

 

Chicago White Sox 70 84 30

 

 

Cleveland Naps 51 102 48 1/2

 

 

 
1913 RED SOX 1915 RED SOX
 

THE FIRST WORLD WAR (1914)