e 2013 Red Sox were likeable, gritty, resilient and very hairy. They were also extremely consistent, which is perhaps the most impressive aspect of their World Series run. The Red Sox’ incredible rebound season wasn’t the product of squeaking by or putting together a few well-timed hot streaks. Sure, there was plenty of walk-off magic, some improbable comebacks and an occasional hiccup, but overall, Boston was a model of steadiness just one year after one of the most unstable efforts in franchise history. The Red Sox went 18-8 to open the season, matching a club record for wins in April. While the Red Sox then jockeyed for position atop the AL East in May and again toward the end of July, the hot start really sent Boston down a path of success. Nothing highlights the Red Sox’ consistency more than the absence of a four-game losing streak. For just the second time in 113 seasons, the Red Sox went the entire year without a losing streak longer than three games. Boston last accomplished the feat in 1903 — when the Boston Americans won their first ever championship — and the Red Sox were the first team since the 2005 Cardinals to go the whole season without losing more than three games in a row. Only two of the Red Sox’ five three-game losing streaks in 2013 came after May, and only one occurred after the All-Star break. In other words, the Red Sox — a team with an uncanny ability to put even the most difficult losses behind them — became even better at turning the page as the season went on. Below are other notes that reflect just how consistent the Red Sox were in 2013. The Red Sox won an MLB-best 33 series in 2013. It was the second-most in club history behind the 1946 team’s 37 series victories. It matched the number of series victories compiled by the 2007, 1949 and 1948 squads. The Red Sox were swept in a multi-game series* just once all season — a three-game sweep at the hands of the Rangers in Texas from May 3-May 5. The one sweep marked the Red Sox’ fewest multi-game series sweeps since 1995. *The Red Sox suffered a one-game make-up series loss to the Rays on July 29. The Red Sox were in first place for an AL-best 158 days in 2013 — including sole possession of first place for 151 of those days. The Red Sox’ 158 days atop the division marked their most days with a share of first place since the 2007 team held the division’s top spot for 173 days. The 2013 Red Sox spent 22 days in second place or tied for second, and spent just three days in third place from May 12-14. The Red Sox didn’t spend one day in first place in 2012. The Red Sox led the majors with a plus-197 run differential (853 runs scored, 656 runs allowed). It marked the second-best differential by a Red Sox team since 1950. Only 19 of the Red Sox’ 65 losses in 2013 were by more than three runs. Of the Red Sox’ 65 losses, 36 (55 percent) came by two runs or fewer. The Red Sox didn’t suffer a loss by more than three runs in a 33-game stretch from Aug. 17-Sept. 22. May marked Boston’s only non-winning month of the season. The Red Sox went 15-15 in May. The Red Sox put together an 11-game streak from Aug. 19-31 in which they didn’t allow more than three runs and eight hits. It was the longest such streak since the 1991 Blue Jays. All of these facts and figures highlighting the Red Sox’ consistency does little to point out the intangible aspect of Boston’s run. The Red Sox were not only able to put losses and rare poor efforts behind them all season, but they did so without a hint of drama. The only noise surrounding the 2013 Red Sox involved on-field matters, which is a stark contrast from the drama-filled 2012 campaign. It really speaks to the group’s workmanlike approach. The 2013 Red Sox will forever be remembered as the bearded bunch who stole Boston’s hearts through their unique personalities and flair for the dramatic. But we also just watched one of the most consistent teams in franchise history, and that — while less exciting than crazy facial hair or clutch grand slams — is really remarkable

Read more at:
http://nesn.com/2013/11/2013-red-sox-will-be-remembered-for-personality-flair-for-dramatic-but-teams-consistency-equally-special/
 
The 2013 Red Sox were likeable, gritty, resilient and very hairy. They were also extremely consistent, which is perhaps the most impressive aspect of their World Series run. The Red Sox’ incredible rebound season wasn’t the product of squeaking by or putting together a few well-timed hot streaks. Sure, there was plenty of walk-off magic, some improbable comebacks and an occasional hiccup, but overall, Boston was a model of steadiness just one year after one of the most unstable efforts in franchise history. The Red Sox went 18-8 to open the season, matching a club record for wins in April. While the Red Sox then jockeyed for position atop the AL East in May and again toward the end of July, the hot start really sent Boston down a path of success. Nothing highlights the Red Sox’ consistency more than the absence of a four-game losing streak. For just the second time in 113 seasons, the Red Sox went the entire year without a losing streak longer than three games. Boston last accomplished the feat in 1903 — when the Boston Americans won their first ever championship — and the Red Sox were the first team since the 2005 Cardinals to go the whole season without losing more than three games in a row. Only two of the Red Sox’ five three-game losing streaks in 2013 came after May, and only one occurred after the All-Star break. In other words, the Red Sox — a team with an uncanny ability to put even the most difficult losses behind them — became even better at turning the page as the season went on. Below are other notes that reflect just how consistent the Red Sox were in 2013. The Red Sox won an MLB-best 33 series in 2013. It was the second-most in club history behind the 1946 team’s 37 series victories. It matched the number of series victories compiled by the 2007, 1949 and 1948 squads. The Red Sox were swept in a multi-game series* just once all season — a three-game sweep at the hands of the Rangers in Texas from May 3-May 5. The one sweep marked the Red Sox’ fewest multi-game series sweeps since 1995. *The Red Sox suffered a one-game make-up series loss to the Rays on July 29. The Red Sox were in first place for an AL-best 158 days in 2013 — including sole possession of first place for 151 of those days. The Red Sox’ 158 days atop the division marked their most days with a share of first place since the 2007 team held the division’s top spot for 173 days. The 2013 Red Sox spent 22 days in second place or tied for second, and spent just three days in third place from May 12-14. The Red Sox didn’t spend one day in first place in 2012. The Red Sox led the majors with a plus-197 run differential (853 runs scored, 656 runs allowed). It marked the second-best differential by a Red Sox team since 1950. Only 19 of the Red Sox’ 65 losses in 2013 were by more than three runs. Of the Red Sox’ 65 losses, 36 (55 percent) came by two runs or fewer. The Red Sox didn’t suffer a loss by more than three runs in a 33-game stretch from Aug. 17-Sept. 22. May marked Boston’s only non-winning month of the season. The Red Sox went 15-15 in May. The Red Sox put together an 11-game streak from Aug. 19-31 in which they didn’t allow more than three runs and eight hits. It was the longest such streak since the 1991 Blue Jays. All of these facts and figures highlighting the Red Sox’ consistency does little to point out the intangible aspect of Boston’s run. The Red Sox were not only able to put losses and rare poor efforts behind them all season, but they did so without a hint of drama. The only noise surrounding the 2013 Red Sox involved on-field matters, which is a stark contrast from the drama-filled 2012 campaign. It really speaks to the group’s workmanlike approach. The 2013 Red Sox will forever be remembered as the bearded bunch who stole Boston’s hearts through their unique personalities and flair for the dramatic. But we also just watched one of the most consistent teams in franchise history, and that — while less exciting than crazy facial hair or clutch grand slams — is really remarkable.

Read more at:
http://nesn.com/2013/11/2013-red-sox-will-be-remembered-for-personality-flair-for-dramatic-but-teams-consistency-equally-special/
 
The 2013 Red Sox were likeable, gritty, resilient and very hairy. They were also extremely consistent, which is perhaps the most impressive aspect of their World Series run. The Red Sox’ incredible rebound season wasn’t the product of squeaking by or putting together a few well-timed hot streaks. Sure, there was plenty of walk-off magic, some improbable comebacks and an occasional hiccup, but overall, Boston was a model of steadiness just one year after one of the most unstable efforts in franchise history. The Red Sox went 18-8 to open the season, matching a club record for wins in April. While the Red Sox then jockeyed for position atop the AL East in May and again toward the end of July, the hot start really sent Boston down a path of success. Nothing highlights the Red Sox’ consistency more than the absence of a four-game losing streak. For just the second time in 113 seasons, the Red Sox went the entire year without a losing streak longer than three games. Boston last accomplished the feat in 1903 — when the Boston Americans won their first ever championship — and the Red Sox were the first team since the 2005 Cardinals to go the whole season without losing more than three games in a row. Only two of the Red Sox’ five three-game losing streaks in 2013 came after May, and only one occurred after the All-Star break. In other words, the Red Sox — a team with an uncanny ability to put even the most difficult losses behind them — became even better at turning the page as the season went on. Below are other notes that reflect just how consistent the Red Sox were in 2013. The Red Sox won an MLB-best 33 series in 2013. It was the second-most in club history behind the 1946 team’s 37 series victories. It matched the number of series victories compiled by the 2007, 1949 and 1948 squads. The Red Sox were swept in a multi-game series* just once all season — a three-game sweep at the hands of the Rangers in Texas from May 3-May 5. The one sweep marked the Red Sox’ fewest multi-game series sweeps since 1995. *The Red Sox suffered a one-game make-up series loss to the Rays on July 29. The Red Sox were in first place for an AL-best 158 days in 2013 — including sole possession of first place for 151 of those days. The Red Sox’ 158 days atop the division marked their most days with a share of first place since the 2007 team held the division’s top spot for 173 days. The 2013 Red Sox spent 22 days in second place or tied for second, and spent just three days in third place from May 12-14. The Red Sox didn’t spend one day in first place in 2012. The Red Sox led the majors with a plus-197 run differential (853 runs scored, 656 runs allowed). It marked the second-best differential by a Red Sox team since 1950. Only 19 of the Red Sox’ 65 losses in 2013 were by more than three runs. Of the Red Sox’ 65 losses, 36 (55 percent) came by two runs or fewer. The Red Sox didn’t suffer a loss by more than three runs in a 33-game stretch from Aug. 17-Sept. 22. May marked Boston’s only non-winning month of the season. The Red Sox went 15-15 in May. The Red Sox put together an 11-game streak from Aug. 19-31 in which they didn’t allow more than three runs and eight hits. It was the longest such streak since the 1991 Blue Jays. All of these facts and figures highlighting the Red Sox’ consistency does little to point out the intangible aspect of Boston’s run. The Red Sox were not only able to put losses and rare poor efforts behind them all season, but they did so without a hint of drama. The only noise surrounding the 2013 Red Sox involved on-field matters, which is a stark contrast from the drama-filled 2012 campaign. It really speaks to the group’s workmanlike approach. The 2013 Red Sox will forever be remembered as the bearded bunch who stole Boston’s hearts through their unique personalities and flair for the dramatic. But we also just watched one of the most consistent teams in franchise history, and that — while less exciting than crazy facial hair or clutch grand slams — is really

Read more at:
http://nesn.com/2013/11/2013-red-sox-will-be-remembered-for-personality-flair-for-dramatic-but-teams-consistency-equally-special/
 
The 2013 Red Sox were likeable, gritty, resilient and very hairy. They were also extremely consistent, which is perhaps the most impressive aspect of their World Series run. The Red Sox’ incredible rebound season wasn’t the product of squeaking by or putting together a few well-timed hot streaks. Sure, there was plenty of walk-off magic, some improbable comebacks and an occasional hiccup, but overall, Boston was a model of steadiness just one year after one of the most unstable efforts in franchise history. The Red Sox went 18-8 to open the season, matching a club record for wins in April. While the Red Sox then jockeyed for position atop the AL East in May and again toward the end of July, the hot start really sent Boston down a path of success. Nothing highlights the Red Sox’ consistency more than the absence of a four-game losing streak. For just the second time in 113 seasons, the Red Sox went the entire year without a losing streak longer than three games. Boston last accomplished the feat in 1903 — when the Boston Americans won their first ever championship — and the Red Sox were the first team since the 2005 Cardinals to go the whole season without losing more than three games in a row. Only two of the Red Sox’ five three-game losing streaks in 2013 came after May, and only one occurred after the All-Star break. In other words, the Red Sox — a team with an uncanny ability to put even the most difficult losses behind them — became even better at turning the page as the season went on. Below are other notes that reflect just how consistent the Red Sox were in 2013. The Red Sox won an MLB-best 33 series in 2013. It was the second-most in club history behind the 1946 team’s 37 series victories. It matched the number of series victories compiled by the 2007, 1949 and 1948 squads. The Red Sox were swept in a multi-game series* just once all season — a three-game sweep at the hands of the Rangers in Texas from May 3-May 5. The one sweep marked the Red Sox’ fewest multi-game series sweeps since 1995. *The Red Sox suffered a one-game make-up series loss to the Rays on July 29. The Red Sox were in first place for an AL-best 158 days in 2013 — including sole possession of first place for 151 of those days. The Red Sox’ 158 days atop the division marked their most days with a share of first place since the 2007 team held the division’s top spot for 173 days. The 2013 Red Sox spent 22 days in second place or tied for second, and spent just three days in third place from May 12-14. The Red Sox didn’t spend one day in first place in 2012. The Red Sox led the majors with a plus-197 run differential (853 runs scored, 656 runs allowed). It marked the second-best differential by a Red Sox team since 1950. Only 19 of the Red Sox’ 65 losses in 2013 were by more than three runs. Of the Red Sox’ 65 losses, 36 (55 percent) came by two runs or fewer. The Red Sox didn’t suffer a loss by more than three runs in a 33-game stretch from Aug. 17-Sept. 22. May marked Boston’s only non-winning month of the season. The Red Sox went 15-15 in May. The Red Sox put together an 11-game streak from Aug. 19-31 in which they didn’t allow more than three runs and eight hits. It was the longest such streak since the 1991 Blue Jays. All of these facts and figures highlighting the Red Sox’ consistency does little to point out the intangible aspect of Boston’s run. The Red Sox were not only able to put losses and rare poor efforts behind them all season, but they did so without a hint of drama. The only noise surrounding the 2013 Red Sox involved on-field matters, which is a stark contrast from the drama-filled 2012 campaign. It really speaks to the group’s workmanlike approach. The 2013 Red Sox will forever be remembered as the bearded bunch who stole Boston’s hearts through their unique personalities and flair for the dramatic. But we also just watched one of the most consistent teams in franchise history, and that — while less exciting than crazy facial hair or clutch grand slams — is really

Read more at:
http://nesn.com/2013/11/2013-red-sox-will-be-remembered-for-personality-flair-for-dramatic-but-teams-consistency-equally-special/
 
The 2013 Red Sox were likeable, gritty, resilient and very hairy. They were also extremely consistent, which is perhaps the most impressive aspect of their World Series run. The Red Sox’ incredible rebound season wasn’t the product of squeaking by or putting together a few well-timed hot streaks. Sure, there was plenty of walk-off magic, some improbable comebacks and an occasional hiccup, but overall, Boston was a model of steadiness just one year after one of the most unstable efforts in franchise history.

Read more at:
http://nesn.com/2013/11/2013-red-sox-will-be-remembered-for-personality-flair-for-dramatic-but-teams-consistency-equally-special/
 
Red Sox were the first team since the 2005 Cardinals to go the whole season without losing more than three games in a row.

Read more at:
http://nesn.com/2013/11/2013-red-sox-will-be-remembered-for-personality-flair-for-dramatic-but-teams-consistency-equally-special

 

1946 BOSTON RED SOX
(THE CURSE OF THE BAMBINO, PART 2) ...
A POWERFUL RED SOX TEAM FAILS IN THE WORLD SERIES ...


 

Tony Lazzeri   Hick Cady   Jeff Tesreau
Died: Aug 6th   Died: March 3rd   Died: Sept 24th
Bill Lee   Jerry Moses   Mike Torrez   Rollie Fingers
Born: Dec 28th   Born: Aug 9th   Born: Aug 28th   Born: Aug 25th
Bob Watson   Catfish Hunter   Reggie Jackson   Bobby Murcer
Born: April 10th   Born: April 8th   Born: May 18th   Born: May 20th



After the end of the war, the Red Sox, like United States Armed Forces, looked invincible. The heart of the club, Johnny Pesky, Ted Williams, Bobby Doerr, and Dom DiMaggio all returned from the service, healthy and in their athletic prime. Tex Hughson's sore arm had healed, Joe Dobson and Mickey Harris were better than average major league pitchers, and Boo Ferriss was one of the few wartime finds with the talent to survive a return to normalcy. The American League, would soon learn that no team was in better shape than the Red Sox.

But just as America soon learned that victory delivered no lasting guarantee of peace, Red Sox fans learned that the appearance of invincibility brought no guarantee of a world championship. The post war Red Sox were dramatically different from the prewar version. Jimmie Foxx, Joe Cronin and Lefty Grove were gone. Built from within, the postwar Sox represented the bounty of a carefully tended farm system. Attendance at Fenway Park would nearly triple from pre-war levels to over 1 1/2 million fans. For the first time since buying the club in 1933, Tom Yawkey began returning a regular profit.

 

The press still picked the New York Yankees to win the pennant, with the defending champion Detroit Tigers also likely to contend. But in January, anticipating the return of Hank Greenberg, Detroit swapped first baseman Rudy York to the Red Sox for shortstop Eddie Lake. With the return of Johnny Pesky, the Red Sox deemed Lake to be expendable. York's swing was built to pepper the left field wall and plugged one of the few holes in the Boston lineup.

Joe Cronin spent the spring sorting out the returning veterans. There were few surprises. Holdovers from the war years were quickly forgotten. Apart from Dave Ferriss, no pitcher from the 1945 Red Sox made the team. Reserve outfielders George Metkovich, Tom McBride and Leon Culberson were the only returning position players of any consequence.

The war hadn't hurt Ted Williams, in fact, it made him physically stronger, and his pilot training aided his concentration. Williams was even more assured, confident, and arrogant than before he left. The Red Sox were now his team and, for better or worse, the two became synonymous. Early on he was hitting .350 and complained that he wasn't getting good pitches to hit.  In May and June he knocked out 19 home runs with 53 RBIs. Nobody laughed when the suggestion that he could break Babe Ruth's home run record was mentioned

Yet for all Williams' brilliance, the key to the Boston success was pitching. Hughson and Ferriss were the best one–two punch in the major leagues, while Harris, Dobson, and swingman Jim Bagby kept Boston in every ballgame. Earl Johnson, Clem Dreisewerd, and Bob Klinger made up the best bullpen in baseball. They kept the games close until Williams, York or  Doerr weighed in with a home run. The only trouble spot for the team was at 3rd base. The club eventually brought back Mike Higgins from Detroit to share the job with Glenn Russell and Ernie Andres.

The Red Sox started fast and took over first place for good on April 28th, winning 15 in a row before losing on May 11th. On April 16th, Ted Williams started things off when he hit a huge home run in Washington to get the Sox off and running in the season opener.  Then on April 20th, Johnny Pesky's home run beat Philadelphia in the Fenway opener.  Eddie Pellagrini's first at bat resulted in a home run the beat the Nats, 5 to 4 on April 22nd.

 

On May 2nd, Williams hit a walk-off home run in the 10th inning to sweep the series with the Tigers.  Leon Culberson followed with a three run home run in the 14th inning to beat the Browns 10-6, on May 7th.  On May 10th it was Rudy York's triple that wrecked the Yankees.

The Red Sox had three .400 hitters in May: Ted Williams, Dom DiMaggio and Johnny Pesky.  But none were hotter than Johnny Pesky.  On May 8th, he set a record by scoring six runs in one game.

Ted Williams hit the longest home run ever hit in Fenway Park on June 9th. In the 1st inning of the 2nd game of a doubleheader against Detroit, he hit a fly ball far over the bullpens to the 33rd row of the bleachers. The ball hit Joe Boucher on they head, knocking a hole in his straw hat.

On May 10th they were 21-3  and by June 11th they were 41-9, as they then hit their first slump of the season.  They lost eight out of their next ten games.  Dave Ferriss, who had started off 10-0 lost three games in a row.  The team stopped hitting, lost three out of four to the White Sox and were swept by the Browns, losing two of the games 2-0 and 1-0.  In the losing streak they lost five games after blowing the lead.  Johnny Pesky on May 6th was batting .430 and on June 22nd was batting .300  .. Ted Williams was batting .427 and May 8th and by June 22nd was batting .350 .. Dom DiMaggio was batting .420 on May 4th and .329 by June 15th.

But the Yankees couldn't take advantage.  The Red Sox had a 10 game lead on June 11th, but only lost only a little ground playing .500 ball for the month leading up to the All Star Game. After the break they still had a 7 1/2 game lead and the pennant race was essentially over.

On June 21st, Bobby Doerr scored from 3rd base on Rudy York's foul pop up to beat Bob Feller in the 10th inn in Cleveland, and on June 23rd, in his first start, Bill Zuber beat the Indians with a three hitter.

The Red Sox cruised into the All-Star break. The All-Star Game played at Fenway Park on July 9th, emphasized the Red Sox dominance. Williams, DiMaggio, Pesky,  Doerr, York, Ferriss, Harris, and catcher Hal Wagner all made the team.

 

Before a capacity crowd, Ted Williams delivered a signature performance in the All Star Game. In his first four at-bats, he walked, hit a home run into the centerfield bleachers, and singled twice for the American League team. Thirty nine year-old pitcher Rip Sewell, of the Pittsburgh Pirates took the mound for the National League in the 8th inning. He was best known for his occasional use of what he called an "eephus" pitch. Thrown in a high wide arc like a slow pitch softball, the pitch frustrated hitters. Only the Cardinals Stan Musial had ever hit it for a home run. Sewell was silent as Ted stepped to the plate with runners on second and third. He fouled off the first "Eephus" pitch, and then Sewell snuck a fastball by him for strike two. A second "Eephus" pitch went wide for a ball. But the third "Eephus" pitch was over the heart of the plate and the ball reversed course sailing into the bullpen as the crowd erupted. The American League won the ballgame 12–0, but after the game was over, all everyone talked about was Ted Williams, who finished the day a perfect 4 for 4.

The Sox started the second half with a walk-off win against the world champion Tigers on July 11th. The Yankees fell back, and three days later the lead was back up to 11 games.  Even the great Joe DiMaggio failed to perform to his pre-war standard. Tom Yawkey rewarded his club early, upping manager Joe Cronin's salary to $40,000 and giving each player on the team, a $5000 life insurance policy.

Williams stayed hot. On July 14th, against Cleveland, he brought back Boston back from an early deficit, by smacking three home runs in an 11–10 record setting win. The Kid became the 56th player in the history of baseball to have three home runs in a single-game.  With his 24th, 25th, and 26th home runs, he figured in nine of the eleven runs the Sox scored. He had eight RBI  At the same time, Indian player–manager Lou Boudreau, devised his own method to cool off Williams. Boudreau decided to use a shift after Williams double down the right-field line in his first at bat. He shifted four infielders to the right side of second base, while the right fielder played the line and the center fielder moved into right–center. Leftfielder George Case was the only player on the left side of the diamond. The logic of the strategy was twofold. Unless the pull–hitting Williams jerked the ball over the fence, there was no room to hit on the right side. But the shift's psychological effect was equally important for it challenged Williams massive ego and provided a distraction.

Ted refused to give in and either bunt or hit the other way. In his first at bat against the shift, he grounded to Boudreau, who was playing where the second baseman generally stood. That shift or something similar to it, was used against Williams for much of the rest of his career. Ted was so good that he eventually learned to hit the ball to left field. The shift was limited to when there was nobody on base, and so it's effectiveness did not prove to be that great.

 

Nothing appeared to slow down the Red Sox juggernaut.  On July 21st, Ted hit for the cycle.  Not to be out done, Rudy York hit two grand slam home runs on July 27th, then it was Bobby Doerr who hit two home runs to beat the Indians on August 25th, 2 to 1.

By September 5th, the Red Sox won eight games in a row and led by 16 1/2 games with their magic number to clinch down to "two". But the Sox suddenly slumped, lost six straight games, and the second-place Detroit Tigers refused to lose. Finally, on September 13th, Ted Williams knocked an inside-the-park home run for the only run of the game, and Tex Hughson spun a three-hitter against Cleveland, to clinch the pennant by a score of, 1 to 0.

The Boston fans, who had not cheered since 1918, put in 500,000 requests for World Series tickets. The Red Sox limped through the remainder of the season, but manager Joe Cronin didn't panic.  It showed however that the Sox were vulnerable.

In the National League, the St. Louis Cardinals and the Brooklyn Dodgers ended the season tied and had to play a best of three playoff. To stay sharp, the Red Sox recruited a team of American League All-Stars to play some exhibition games. Despite the fact that great ballplayers like Luke Appling, Hank Greenberg, and Joe DiMaggio provided the opposition, fewer than 2000 fans showed up to watch. The game were more of a disaster on the field than at the gate. Dom DiMaggio jammed his thumb catching a line drive and Williams was struck on the right elbow by a pitch.

The Cardinals swept the Dodgers, and on October 3rd, the Red Sox boarded a train for St. Louis. In an instant the series almost became an afterthought. Rumors began to abound that the Red Sox were going to trade Williams after the series, for Joe DiMaggio. None of the Red Sox executives answered the rumor, therefore giving it some credibility. The Sox players clearly became distracted. Ted Williams kept pumping the press for more information, while Eddie Collins, Joe Cronin, and Tom Yawkey still had no comment.

 

Tex Hughson opened the series for the Red Sox in Game #1 facing Howie Pollett. In the 9th inning with Pinky Higgins on third base and Boston one strike away from defeat, pinch-hitter Tom McBride singled to tie the score. Rudy York then homered to left and Earl Johnson set down the Cardinals to give the Red Sox a 3–2 win.

In Game #2, Cardinals' pitcher Harry Brecheen mixed a devastating screwball with curves and fastballs to out-pitch Mickey Harris. He scattered four hits and knocked in the only run, necessary to win, himself giving the Cardinals a 3–0 victory.

The series headed to Boston for the next three games, where at Fenway Park, the Red Sox had accumulated an astounding 61–16 record. Ferriss got the nod to start Game #3 opposite Murray Dickson. Rudy York homered in the first inning to knock in three Red Sox runs. Ferriss threw a four hit shutout to give the Red Sox a 4–0 win and a 2–1 lead in the series.

In Game #4 Cronin pitched Tex Hughson on three days rest. The Red Sox played their worst game of the series. Hughson and five relievers were shelled as the Cardinals cruised to an easy 12–3 win to tie up the series.

Apart from Rudy York and Bobby Doerr, the Red Sox simply were not playing good baseball. Williams was physically hurt and distracted, while Johnny Pesky played a nervous shortstop and Dom DiMaggio was pressing, running into outs and making mistakes in the field.

 

Before Game #5, Bobby Doerr had been suffering from migraines and couldn't see straight. Manager Joe Cronin moved the aging Don Gutteridge into the leadoff slot to take the place of  Doerr. Gutteridge singled to lead off the game and Williams knocked him in for his only RBI of the series. Sox pitcher Joe Dobson scattered 4 hits and the Red Sox put the game away, leaving Boston with a three-game to two-game lead.

In St. Louis, Joe Cronin decided to pitch Mickey Harris in Game #6, who the Cardinals had already beaten. Boston jumped out quickly. With one out, Johnny Pesky and Dom DiMaggio singled to bring up Williams in one of the most important at-bats of his career. Harry Brecheen were carefully to Ted and walked him, bringing up Rudy York the bases loaded, who grounded out into a double play. By the fourth inning, the Cardinals had jumped out to a 3–0 lead and Mickey Harris was sent to the showers. Tex Hughson came in and stopped the Cardinals cold, but it was too late. St. Louis won the game 4–1 to tie the series and send it to a seventh and deciding game.

For Game #7, the Red Sox sent Ferriss to oppose Murry Dickson. For the third game in a row Boston nearly broke the game wide open in the fist inning. Outfielder Wally Moses and Johnny Pesky both singled. Moses scored on DiMaggio's fly to right and Williams followed by lining a rope to center field that Terry Moore was able to track down on the run, allowing his team to escape down 1–0. The Cardinals tied the game in the third and then took the lead in the fifth, scoring twice to knock Ferriss from the game.

In top of the eighth inning, down 3-1, the Red Sox threatened again and Harry Brecheen, who had not let Boston beat him yet, was once again brought in with runners on second and third base. Dom DiMaggio sliced the ball to the right-field wall, scoring both runners easily to tie the game. With the go-ahead run at second base, Ted Williams ended the threat with a pop up.

 

In bottom of the inning, with the score tied, Joe Cronin brought in Bob Klinger. Speedster Enos Slaughter greeted him with a single to center. Klinger got the next two batters, and Harry Walker stepped the plate. What happened next was one of the most talked about plays in Red Sox history. Slaughter broke for second base off a walking lead. Pesky ran over to cover second base as Walker blooped one over the vacated shortstop spot into left centerfield. Centerfielder Leon Culberson got a good jump on the ball, but had no chance to catch it. He caught the ball on the bounce and tossed the ball to Pesky, who had his back to the plate, thinking Slaughter would stop at third base. But Slaughter kept running and was past third base just as Pesky received the ball. Pesky spun toward third base, picked up Slaughter heading for home, and then threw to the plate. The throw drifted up the third base line and his catcher Roy Partee came out to catch it, as Slaughter slid safely home with the go-ahead run. In the ninth inning, the Red Sox threatened but the Cardinals stopped them to become the World Champions.

The Cardinals, who after a grueling pennant race and a playoff series, outplayed the Red Sox who had distanced themselves from their nearest competitors in the American League. Joe Cronin was criticized for the choices he made, and Ted Williams left the clubhouse as he arrived, feeling alone and battered. Tom Yawkey only then released a statement to the press, denying that he would ever trade Ted Williams.

 

 
11/30/1945  Charlie Wagner signs his 1946 contract
12/04/1945  Ted Williams arrives home in San Diego
12/07/1945  Johnny Pesky arrives home in Oregon from the South Pacific
12/11/1945  Ernie Andres purchased from Louisville
12/12/1945  Jim Bagby traded to the Red Sox from Cleveland
12/15/1945  Jim Tabor discharged from the army
12/16/1945  The All Star game will again be scheduled and played at Fenway Park on July 9th
12/20/1945  Larry Powell re-signs with the Red Sox
12/24/1945  Johnny Pesky meets with Joe Cronin
12/28/1945  Bobby Doerr is discharged from the army
12/29/1945  Bob Johnson and Dolph Camilli are released
01/04/1946  The Red Sox trade Eddie Lake to Detroit for Rudy York
01/15/1946  Ted Williams is discharged from the Marines
01/16/1946  Mace Brown is discharged from the service
01/23/1946  Jim Tabor is sold to the Philadelphia Phillies
01/25/1946  Ted Williams signs new Red Sox contract for $40,000
01/27/1946  Pete Fox signs his contract
01/28/1946  Earl Johnson, Randy Heflin and Bill Conroy sign with the Red Sox
01/29/1946  Don Lang, Larry Powell, Eddie Pellagrini, Bob Steiner and Howard Doyle sign their contracts
02/06/1946  Jim Bagby, Gus Clark, Leon Culberson, Melvin Deutsch and Eddie McGah sign their contracts
02/10/1946  Coach Tom Daly heads to Florida
02/13/1946  Johnny Pesky signs his contract for $12,000
02/15/1946  Sam Mele signs with the Red Sox
02/17/1946  Bobby Doerr signs his contract for $17,500
02/22/1946  The Red Sox head out from South Station for Florida
 
 SPRING TRAINING DIARY
02/24/1946  The Red Sox arrive in Florida
02/25/1946  Ted Williams arrives in camp and works out
02/26/1946  Rudy York remains unsigned
02/27/1946  Jackie Robinson arrives at the Brooklyn Dodger spring training camp
03/01/1946  Rudy York signs his contract and reports to spring training
03/02/1946  Dom DiMaggio arrives at spring training
03/03/1946  The Red Sox hold their first intrasquad game
03/04/1946  Hal Wagner injures his foot
03/05/1946  Yannigans L 4-1  
03/06/1946  Yannigans L 6-3  
03/07/1946  Ted Williams is offered $500,000 to play in the Mexican League
03/09/1946  at Washington Nationals (Havana) L 10-9  
03/10/1946  at Washington Nationals (Havana) W 7-3  
 Cleveland Indians L 5-4  
03/12/1946  St. Louis Cardinals W 1-0  
03/15/1946  New York Yankees L 6-4  
03/16/1946  at Cleveland Indians (Clearwater) W 11-8  
03/17/1946  at New York Yankees (St. Petersburg) L 4-3  
 Kansas City Blues W 6-0  
03/18/1946  at St. Louis Cardinals (St. Petersburg) pp  
03/19/1946  Cincinnati Reds L 9-1  
 Cincinnati Reds W 4-3  
03/20/1946  St. Louis Cardinals L 9-6  
03/21/1946  Louisville Colonels W 6-0  
 at New York Yankees W 9-5  
03/22/1946  Cleveland Indians W 11-4  
03/23/1946  Detroit Tigers W 7-1  
 at Newark Bears W 17-5  
03/24/1946  New York Yankees L 6-4  
03/25/1946  at Boston Braves (Ft. Lauderdale) L 5-2  
03/26/1946  at Detroit Tigers (Lakeville) L 4-0  
03/27/1946  at Louisville Colonels (Ft. Myers) W 10-8  
03/28/1946  at New York Yankees (St. Petersburg) T 4-4  
03/29/1946  St. Louis Cardinals W 3-2  
03/30/1946  at St. Louis Cardinals (St. Petersburg) L 9-2  
03/31/1946  at Cincinnati Reds (Tampa) W 3-0  
 Louisville Colonels L 7-5  
04/01/1946  Cincinnati Reds W 8-3  
 Cincinnati Reds W 4-2  
04/03/1946  Cincinnati Reds (Leesburg, FL) L 9-8  
 at Cincinnati Reds (Leesburg, FL) W 2-1  
04/04/1946  at Cincinnati Reds (Dothan, AL) W 9-5  
04/05/1946  at Cincinnati Reds (Selma, AL) L 4-2  
 Cincinnati Reds (Selma, AL) L 2-1  
04/06/1946  at Cincinnati Reds (Montgomery, AL) W 10-0  
 Cincinnati Reds (Montgomery, AL) L 7-5  
04/07/1946  at Cincinnati Reds (Birmingham, AL) W 9-3  
 Cincinnati Reds (Birmingham, AL) L 4-3  
04/08/1946  at Cincinnati Reds (Louisville, KY) W 3-2  
 at Cincinnati Reds (Louisville, KY) W 2-0  
04/09/1946  Cincinnati Reds (Lexington, KY) L 4-2  
04/11/1946  at Boston Braves (Hartford, CT) T 3-3  
04/12/1946  Boston Braves W 11-5  
04/13/1946  Boston Braves L 7-3  
04/14/1946  Boston Braves W 19-5  
04/15/1946  Ernie Andres wins the third base job
 
GAME LOG
  RECORD PLACE GB/GF OPPONENT SCORE  PITCHER W/L
04/16/1946 1-0 1st -  at Washington Nationals W 6-3 Tex Hughson 1-0
04/17/1946 2-0 1st -  at Washington Nationals W 13-6 Earl Johnson 1-0
04/18/1946 3-0 1st +1/2  at Washington Nationals W 3-1 Mickey Harris 1-0
04/19/1946 3-0 1st +1/2  
04/20/1946 4-0 1st +1  Philadelphia Athletics W 2-1 Tex Hughson 2-0
04/21/1946 5-0 1st +1  Philadelphia Athletics W 12-11 Joe Dobson 1-0
5-1 1st +1/2 L 3-0 Jim Bagby 0-1
04/22/1946 6-1 1st +1/2  Washington Nationals W 5-4 Mickey Harris 2-0
04/23/1946 6-2 1st -  Washington Nationals L 8-2 Mike Ryba 0-1
04/24/1946 6-3 3rd -1  New York Yankees L 12-5 Tex Hughson 2-1
04/25/1946 7-3 2nd -  New York Yankees W 12-5 Joe Dobson 2-0
04/26/1946 8-3 1st -  at Philadelphia Athletics W 7-0 Dave Ferriss 1-0
04/27/1946 8-3 2nd -1/2  at Philadelphia Athletics pp  
04/28/1946 9-3 1st +1/2  at Philadelphia Athletics W 5-1 Mickey Harris 3-0
10-3 1st +1 W 2-1 Tex Hughson 3-1
04/29/1946 10-3 1st +1  
04/30/1946 11-3 1st +2  Detroit Tigers W 4-0 Joe Dobson 3-0
05/01/1946 12-3 1st +2  Detroit Tigers W 13-1 Dave Ferriss 2-0
05/02/1946 13-3 1st +2  Detroit Tigers W 5-4 Clem Dreisewerd 1-0
05/03/1946 14-3 1st +2  Cleveland Indians W 9-4 Mickey Harris 4-0
05/04/1946 15-3 1st +2  Cleveland Indians W 6-2 Jim Bagby 1-1
05/05/1946 15-3 1st +1 1/2  St. Louis Browns pp  
pp  
05/06/1946 16-3 1st +2 1/2  St. Louis Browns W 7-5 Dave Ferriss 3-0
17-3 1st +3 W 5-4 Joe Dobson 4-0
05/07/1946 18-3 1st +3 1/2  St. Louis Browns W 10-6 Clem Dreisewerd 2-0
05/08/1946 19-3 1st +3 1/2  Chicago White Sox W 14-10 Mickey Harris 5-0
05/09/1946 20-3 1st +4 1/2  Chicago White Sox W 7-5 Jim Bagby 2-1
05/10/1946 21-3 1st +5 1/2  at New York Yankees W 5-4 Earl Johnson 2-0
05/11/1946 21-4 1st +4 1/2  at New York Yankees L 2-0 Tex Hughson 3-2
05/12/1946 22-4 1st +5 1/2  at New York Yankees W 3-1 Mickey Harris 6-0
05/13/1946 22-4 1st +5 1/2  
05/14/1946 23-4 1st +5 1/2  at Chicago White Sox W 3-0 Dave Ferriss 4-0
05/15/1946 23-5 1st +5 1/2  at Chicago White Sox L 3-2 Tex Hughson 3-3
05/16/1946 23-6 1st +5  at St. Louis Browns L 3-0 Joe Dobson 4-1
05/17/1946 23-6 1st +4 1/2  at St. Louis Browns pp  
05/18/1946 24-6 1st +5 1/2  at St. Louis Browns W 18-8 Mickey Harris 7-0
05/19/1946 25-6 1st +5 1/2  at Detroit Tigers W 4-0 Dave Ferriss 5-0
25-7 1st +4 1/2 L 3-2 Tex Hughson 3-4
05/20/1946 25-7 1st +5  
05/21/1946 26-7 1st +6  at Detroit Tigers W 6-4 Earl Johnson 3-0
05/22/1946 27-7 1st +6  at Cleveland Indians W 7-4 Dave Ferriss 6-0
05/23/1946 27-8 1st +5  at Cleveland Indians L 3-2 Randy Heflin 0-1
05/24/1946 27-8 1st +5  
05/25/1946 28-8 1st +6  New York Yankees W 7-4 Dave Ferriss 7-0
05/26/1946 29-8 1st +7  New York Yankees W 1-0 Tex Hughson 4-4
29-9 1st +6 L 4-1 Mickey Harris 7-1
05/27/1946 29-9 1st +6  
05/28/1946 29-9 1st +6 1/2  Philadelphia Athletics pp  
05/29/1946 30-9 1st +6 1/2  Philadelphia Athletics W 2-0 Dave Ferriss 8-0
05/30/1946 31-9 1st +6 1/2  Washington Nationals W 6-5 Joe Dobson 5-1
32-9 1st +6 1/2 W 7-2 Mickey Harris 8-1
05/31/1946 32-9 1st +6 1/2  
06/01/1946 32-9 1st +6 1/2  Chicago White Sox pp  
06/02/1946 32-9 1st +6 1/2  Chicago White Sox pp  
pp  
06/03/1946 33-9 1st +6 1/2  Chicago White Sox W 6-1 Dave Ferriss 9-0
34-9 1st +7 W 5-2 Joe Dobson 6-1
06/04/1946 35-9 1st +7  St. Louis Browns W 9-4 Earl Johnson 4-0
06/05/1946 35-9 1st +6 1/2  St. Louis Browns T 8-8  
06/06/1946 36-9 1st +6 1/2  St. Louis Browns W 5-4 Mace Brown 1-0
06/07/1946 36-9 1st +6  
06/08/1946 37-9 1st +7  Detroit Tigers W 15-4 Joe Dobson 7-1
06/09/1946 38-9 1st +8  Detroit Tigers W 7-1 Mickey Harris 9-1
39-9 1st +8 W 11-6 Dave Ferriss 10-0
06/10/1946 40-9 1st +9  Cleveland Indians W 6-3 Bill Butland 1-0
06/11/1946 41-9 1st +10  Cleveland Indians W 10-5 Bob Klinger 1-0
06/12/1946 41-10 1st +10  Cleveland Indians L 7-2 Jim Bagby 2-2
06/13/1946 41-10 1st +10  
06/14/1946 41-11 1st +9  at Chicago White Sox L 9-5 Earl Johnson 4-1
06/15/1946 41-12 1st +9  at Chicago White Sox L 7-6 Dave Ferriss 10-1
06/16/1946 42-12 1st +9  at Chicago White Sox W 6-1 Tex Hughson 5-4
42-13 1st +8 L 7-4 Jim Bagby 2-3
06/17/1946 42-14 1st +7 1/2  at St. Louis Browns L 7-1 Mickey Harris 9-2
06/18/1946 42-15 1st +7  at St. Louis Browns L 1-0 Dave Ferriss 10-2
06/19/1946 42-15 1st +7  at St. Louis Browns pp  
06/20/1946 42-16 1st +6 1/2  at St. Louis Browns L 2-0 Joe Dobson 7-2
06/21/1946 43-16 1st +7 1/2  at Cleveland Indians W 1-0 Tex Hughson 6-4
06/22/1946 43-17 1st +6 1/2  at Cleveland Indians L 4-3 Dave Ferriss 10-3
06/23/1946 44-17 1st +6 1/2  at Cleveland Indians W 5-1 Mickey Harris 10-2
45-17 1st +7 W 6-0 Bill Zuber 1-0
06/24/1946 45-17 1st +6 1/2  at Detroit Tigers T 5-5  
06/25/1946 46-17 1st +7 1/2  at Detroit Tigers W 1-0 Tex Hughson 7-4
06/26/1946 46-18 1st +6 1/2  at Detroit Tigers L 16-2 Joe Dobson 7-3
47-18 1st +7 W 9-3 Dave Ferriss 11-3
06/27/1946 47-18 1st +7  
06/28/1946 48-18 1st +7  Washington Nationals W 12-1 Mickey Harris 11-2
06/29/1946 49-18 1st +8  Washington Nationals W 12-8 Tex Hughson 8-4
06/30/1946 50-18 1st +9  Washington Nationals W 15-8 Dave Ferriss 12-3
51-18 1st +8 1/2 L 9-2 Earl Johnson 4-2
07/01/1946 51-18 1st +8 1/2  
07/02/1946 51-19 1st +7 1/2  at New York Yankees L 2-1 Mickey Harris 11-3
07/03/1946 51-20 1st +6 1/2  at New York Yankees L 3-2 Tex Hughson 8-5
07/04/1946 51-21 1st +6 1/2  at Philadelphia Athletics L 3-2 Dave Ferriss 12-4
51-22 1st +6 1/2 W 9-8 Clem Dreisewerd 3-0
07/05/1946 52-22 1st +7 1/2  at Philadelphia Athletics W 5-2 Joe Dobson 8-3
07/06/1946 52-23 1st +6 1/2  at Washington Nationals L 4-0 Mickey Harris 11-4
07/07/1946 53-23 1st +7 1/2  at Washington Nationals W 11-1 Tex Hughson 9-5
54-23 1st +7 1/2 W 9-4 Clem Dreisewerd 4-0
07/08/1946 All Star Game Break
07/09/1946
07/10/1946
07/11/1946 55-23 1st +7 1/2  Detroit Tigers W 3-2 Tex Hughson 10-5
07/12/1946 56-23 1st +8  Detroit Tigers W 4-2 Dave Ferriss 13-4
07/13/1946 57-23 1st +9  Detroit Tigers W 5-4 Mickey Harris 12-4
07/14/1946 58-23 1st +10  Cleveland Indians W 11-10 Jim Bagby 3-3
59-23 1st +11 W 6-4 Bill Zuber 2-0
07/15/1946 59-23 1st +11 1/2  
07/16/1946 59-24 1st +11  Cleveland Indians L 6-3 Tex Hughson 10-6
07/17/1946 60-24 1st +11  Chicago White Sox W 3-1 Joe Dobson 9-3
61-24 1st +11 W 6-1 Dave Ferriss 14-4
07/18/1946 62-24 1st +11  Chicago White Sox W 3-2 Mickey Harris 13-4
07/19/1946 63-24 1st +11 1/2  Chicago White Sox W 9-2 Bill Zuber 3-0
07/20/1946 63-25 1st +10 1/2  St. Louis Browns L 5-4 Tex Hughson 10-7
07/21/1946 64-25 1st +11 1/2  St. Louis Browns W 6-1 Dave Ferriss 15-4
65-25 1st +11 1/2 W 7-4 Joe Dobson 10-3
07/22/1946 65-25 1st +11 1/2  
07/23/1946 65-26 1st +11 1/2  at Chicago White Sox L 7-1 Bill Zuber 3-2
07/24/1946 66-26 1st +11 1/2  at Chicago White Sox W 4-1 Tex Hughson 11-7
07/25/1946 66-27 1st +11  at Chicago White Sox L 3-1 Joe Dobson 10-4
07/26/1946 67-27 1st +11  at St. Louis Browns W 8-5 Dave Ferriss 16-4
07/27/1946 68-27 1st +11  at St. Louis Browns W 13-6 Charlie Wagner 1-0
07/28/1946 68-28 1st +11  at St. Louis Browns L 3-2 Tex Hughson 11-8
69-28 1st +11 W 11-4 Jim Bagby 4-3
07/29/1946 69-28 1st +11 1/2  
07/30/1946 70-28 1st +12 1/2  at Cleveland Indians W 4-0 Dave Ferriss 17-4
07/31/1946 70-29 1st +12 1/2  at Cleveland Indians L 2-1 Mickey Harris 13-5
08/01/1946 70-30 1st +11 1/2  at Cleveland Indians L 2-1 Joe Dobson 10-5
08/02/1946 70-31 1st +11 1/2  at Detroit Tigers L 7-1 Tex Hughson 11-9
08/03/1946 71-31 1st +12  at Detroit Tigers W 5-3 Dave Ferriss 18-4
08/04/1946 72-31 1st +12  at Detroit Tigers W 9-4 Mickey Harris 14-5
08/05/1946 72-31 1st +12  
08/06/1946 73-31 1st +12 1/2  Philadelphia Athletics W 5-0 Tex Hughson 12-9
08/07/1946 73-31 1st +13  Philadelphia Athletics pp  
08/08/1946 74-31 1st +12 1/2  Philadelphia Athletics W 4-3 Joe Dobson 11-5
75-31 1st +13 W 10-6 Bob Klinger 2-0
08/09/1946 76-31 1st +14  at New York Yankees W 4-3 Dave Ferriss 19-4
08/10/1946 76-32 1st +13  at New York Yankees L 7-5 Clem Dreisewerd 4-1
08/11/1946 77-32 1st +14  at New York Yankees W 7-5 Mace Brown 2-0
77-33 1st +13 L 9-1 Jim Bagby 4-4
08/12/1946 77-33 1st +13  
08/13/1946 78-33 1st +13 1/2  at Philadelphia Athletics W 7-5 Dave Ferriss 20-4
08/14/1946 79-33 1st +13 1/2  at Philadelphia Athletics W 3-1 Tex Hughson 13-9
08/15/1946 79-34 1st +12  at Philadelphia Athletics L 5-3 Joe Dobson 11-6
08/16/1946 80-34 1st +13  New York Yankees W 4-1 Mickey Harris 15-5
08/17/1946 81-34 1st +14  New York Yankees W 7-4 Dave Ferriss 21-4
08/18/1946 81-35 1st +13  New York Yankees L 5-0 Tex Hughson 13-10
82-35 1st +14 W 4-3 Bob Klinger 3-0
08/19/1946 82-35 1st +14  St. Louis Browns pp  
08/20/1946 83-35 1st +15  St. Louis Browns W 5-1 Jim Bagby 5-4
83-36 1st +14 1/2 L 5-4 Mickey Harris 15-6
08/21/1946 84-36 1st +14  St. Louis Browns W 12-9 Dave Ferriss 22-4
08/22/1946 84-37 1st +12 1/2  Chicago White Sox L 4-3 Mace Brown 2-1
08/23/1946 84-37 1st +12  Chicago White Sox pp  
08/24/1946 85-37 1st +13  Chicago White Sox W 6-5 Mace Brown 3-1
85-38 1st +12 1/2 L 3-1 Jim Bagby 5-5
08/25/1946 86-38 1st +13  Cleveland Indians W 2-1 Dave Ferriss 23-4
87-38 1st +13 W 13-6 Earl Johnson 5-2
08/26/1946 88-38 1st +14  Cleveland Indians W 5-1 Tex Hughson 14-10
08/27/1946 88-39 1st +14 1/2  
08/28/1946 88-39 1st +13 1/2  Detroit Tigers L 7-2 Mickey Harris 15-7
08/29/1946 88-40 1st +12 1/2  Detroit Tigers L 9-8 Bob Klinger 3-1
08/30/1946 89-40 1st +13  Philadelphia Athletics W 6-0 Tex Hughson 15-10
90-40 1st +13 1/2 W 6-2 Jim Bagby 6-5
08/31/1946 91-40 1st +13 1/2  Philadelphia Athletics W 4-2 Bill Zuber 4-2
09/01/1946 92-40 1st +13 1/2  Philadelphia Athletics W 4-3 Tex Hughson 16-10
09/02/1946 93-40 1st +14 1/2  at New York Yankees W 2-1 Dave Ferriss 24-4
94-40 1st +15 1/2 W 6-2 Mickey Harris 16-8
09/03/1946 94-40 1st +15 1/2  
09/04/1946 95-40 1st +16 1/2  at Washington Nationals W 4-2 Tex Hughson 17-10
09/05/1946 96-40 1st +16 1/2  at Washington Nationals W 1-0 Jim Bagby 7-5
09/06/1946 96-41 1st +16 1/2  at Washington Nationals L 3-2 Earl Johnson 5-3
09/07/1946 96-42 1st +15 1/2  at Philadelphia Athletics L 4-2 Dave Ferriss 24-5
09/08/1946 96-43 1st +16  at Philadelphia Athletics L 5-3 Tex Hughson 17-11
09/09/1946 96-43 1st +16  
09/10/1946 96-44 1st +16  at Detroit Tigers L 9-1 Mickey Harris 16-9
09/11/1946 96-45 1st +15  at Detroit Tigers L 7-3 Dave Ferriss 24-6
09/12/1946 96-46 1st +14  at Cleveland Indians L 4-1 Jim Bagby 7-6
09/13/1946 97-46 1st +15  at Cleveland Indians W 1-0 Tex Hughson 18-11
09/14/1946 97-46 1st +14 1/2  
09/15/1946 98-46 1st +15 1/2  at Chicago White Sox W 4-1 Dave Ferriss 25-6
98-47 1st +15 L 6-0 Earl Johnson 5-4
09/16/1946 98-47 1st +14 1/2  
09/17/1946 98-47 1st +14  
09/18/1946 99-47 1st +14  at St. Louis Browns W 6-2 Joe Dobson 12-6
09/19/1946 99-48 1st +13  at St. Louis Browns L 6-5 Bob Klinger 3-2
09/20/1946 99-48 1st +12 1/2  
09/21/1946 100-48 1st +12 1/2  at Washington Nationals W 7-5 Bill Zuber 5-2
09/22/1946 101-48 1st +12  at Washington Nationals W 4-1 Tex Hughson 19-11
09/23/1946 101-48 1st +12  
09/24/1946 102-48 1st +11 1/2  New York Yankees W 5-4 Mickey Harris 17-9
09/25/1946 103-48 1st +12 1/2  New York Yankees W 5-2 Joe Dobson 13-6
09/26/1946 103-48 1st +12  Yankees (Douglas MA) L 8-7  
09/27/1946 104-48 1st +13  Washington Nationals W 5-4 Tex Hughson 20-11
09/28/1946 104-49 1st +12  Washington Nationals L 4-3 Mickey Harris 17-10
09/29/1946 104-50 1st +12  Washington Nationals L 7-0 Joe Dobson 13-7
09/30/1946  The All Stars arrive in Boston
10/01/1946  American League All Stars W 2-0

 Ted Williams injured

10/02/1946  American League All Stars L 4-2  
10/03/1946  American League All Stars W 4-1

The Sox leave for St. Louis

 
THE WORLD  SERIES
  RECORD GAME OPPONENT SCORE  PITCHER W/L
10/06/2004 1-0 Game #1  at St. Louis Cardinals W 3-2 Earl Johnson 1-0
10/07/2004 1-1 Game #2  at St. Louis Cardinals L 3-0 Mickey Harris 0-1
10/08/2004

 The Red Sox and Cardinals arrive back in Boston for Game #3

10/09/2004 2-1 Game #3  St. Louis Cardinals W 4-0 Dave Ferriss 1-0
10/10/2004 2-2 Game #4  St. Louis Cardinals L 12-3 Tex Hughson 0-1
10/11/2004 3-2 Game #5  St. Louis Cardinals W 6-3 Joe Dobson 1-0
10/12/2004

 The Red Sox and Cardinals head back to St. Louis

10/13/2004 3-3 Game #6  at St. Louis Cardinals L 4-1 Mickey Harris 0-2
10/14/2004

 The Red Sox and Cardinals practice at Sportsman's Park

10/15/2004 4-3 Game #7  at St. Louis Cardinals L 4-3 Bob Klinger 0-1
10/16/2004

 The Red Sox return to Boston and plan to head out of town for the winter

 
1946 RED SOX BATTING & PITCHING
 
 

 

 

FINAL 1946 A.L. STANDINGS

 

 

BOSTON RED SOX

104 50 -

 

 

Detroit Tigers 92 62 12

 

 

New York Yankees 87 67 17

 

 

Washington Senators 76 78 28

 

 

Chicago White Sox 74 80 30

 

 

Cleveland Indians 68 86 36

 

 

St. Louis Browns 66 88 38

 

 

Philadelphia Athletics 49 105 55

 

 

 
1947 RED SOX
 


THE 1946 WORLD SERIES

 

 
THE 1946 ALL STAR GAME